First Aid Kits

Portable First Aid Kits For Hiking and Dog Parks

While hiking through the woods or playing in a dog park, you do not want to haul around a suitcase for possible pet first aid needs. You want something that fits into a fanny pack or camera case. Since we have limited space, we want many of these items to do double duty.

 

  1. Emergency muzzle. If we need to use the kit, your pet is probably in pain. Protect yourself. Any pet in pain, can and will bite.™ You can fashion a muzzle out of two shoestrings tied together, a lead, a belt or a tie. Just don’t use anything made out of wire as that will cut into a pets snout. For dogs with pushed in faces such as pugs or shih tzus, you can wrap the face with a sweater, towel, shirt, etc. Or you can buy one that fits your pet from any petstore.
  2. Roll of gauze or vet wrap. 
  3. Gauze pads. Leave them in the sealed bag until you are ready to use them.
  4. Bandanas. You can splint leg injuries with them or use them as slings to help carry out injured pets.
  5. Travel size sterile eye wash in a sealed bottled. Unsealed bottles are no longer sterile and have a way of becoming empty bottles. It can be used to flush out eye irritants and wounds. Bottled water is not sterile water.
  6. A Snout-To-Tail assessment form. It’s a good idea to do an assessment prior to strenous activity. You can determine beforehand if there are any injuries that may be exacerbated by exercise. Do an assessment after exercise to check for ticks, burrs or any injuries that occurred during your outing that went unnoticed. You can request a form at S2T@pettech.net.
  7. Travel size hydrogen peroxide. It can be used to induce vomiting.
  8. Small bottle of Novalsan to clean out wounds. You can buy a bottle at your veterinarian’s office. It doesn’t damage surrounding tissue like rubbing alcohol does.
  9. A laminated photo of you WITH your dog. It will establish ownership should you become separated and someone else finds them. 
  10. Liquid gel antihistamine and a safety pin. The fastest way to get an antihistamine into your pet’s system in case of an allergic reaction, is to poke a hole into the liquid gel cap and squirt directly onto the tongue. Ask your veterinarian for proper dosing for your pet. 
  11. A plastic card such as an old library card or any of the dozens you receive in junk mail. They have two uses. One is to flick out bee stingers. The second is for pad injuries. They are the perfect size for dog feet. 
  12. Antibiotic cream.
  13. Bandaids for you.
  14. Fold up water container. Some can fold up as small as a credit card. Water is important to prevent dehydration.
  15. Constricting band. Very important if you hike in areas with poisonous snakes.
  16. LED light that are made for keychains. You can put them on their collars so they are easier to see in the dark.

 

Learn how to use the items in your kit by taking a pet first aid class. Minutes matter in an emergency. Being prepared can mean the difference between life and death. To learn more about pet first aid visit me at www.pawsitivelypretty.com.

 


PET FIRST AID KITS VER. 4

                              PET FIRST AID KITS

                                   BY MARY OQUENDO CMPTI, CCS  

                                      ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2010

What’s so important about pet first aid kits? Accidents aren’t planned, they can and do happen. Therefore, preparation is key. The American Animal Hospital Association states that 25% more pets could have been saved if only ONE pet first aid technique was applied before veterinary treatment. First aid means the difference between life and death, between temporary and permanent disability and between a short recuperation and a long recovery. A pet first aid kit plays a vital role.

I recommend taking the time putting your own kit together. If you choose to buy a pre-packaged kit, verify the contents suit your needs. In addition, replace items when used and check expiration dates on a regular basis.

What’s in my kit? I keep the contents in a large, denim Tinkerbell bag. Aside from Tink being the “bomb”, the bag is convenient to move from location to location. Other options include fishing (tackle) and craft boxes, which have plenty of compartments for storage. Suggested items are listed by category. There is some overlap between categories.

BLEEDING AND WOUNDS

  1. Adhesive tape.
  2. Gauze pads.
  3. Gauze rolls.
  4. Vet wrap.
  5. Cotton roll. This is used for head and large area wounds.
  6. Non-stick gauze.
  7. Antibiotic cream.
  8. Providone Iodine ointment.
  9. Sanitary napkins. They are used to soak up excess blood. 
  10. Bandanas/triangular bandages. They can be used for splinting fractures and covering wounds. In addition, they can be used to aid a dog in walking by taking the pressure off of an injured limb.
  11. Paint stirrers can be used for splinting.
  12. Sealed sterile solution for flushing wounds. An unsealed bottle is no longer sterile, nor is bottled water.
  13. 0.2% chlorohexidine rinse.  Used to rinse out wounds. The 0.2% is important. Less than that is not effective and more can cause cellular damage. I no longer use alcohol or hydrogen peroxide to flush wounds. Alcohol stings and hydrogen peroxide damages cellular tissue. In addition, both will slow healing. Nolvasan is a brand name.
  14. Nexaband. Your vet can demonstrate the right way to use this product. It is important that the wound is properly cleaned and dried first. Never use Nexaband on bite wounds.
  15. Plastic cards are the right size for paw injuries. Cushion them with extra gauze to protect the pad.
  16. Tea bags. They contain tannic acid which helps to clot bleeding injuries.

ANAPHYLACTIC SHOCK, ALLERGIC REACTIONS AND INSECT BITES

  1. Premeasured dose of LIQUID gel antihistamine as determined by your vet.
  2. Safety pin.

The safety pin is used to puncture a hole in the liquid gel. It is then squirted onto the tongue of the pet. This is the easiest and most effective way to administer an antihistamine.

  1. Plastic card for flicking out bee stingers. Do not tweeze them out as you only inject more venom into the pet. Place the card under the stinger and lift up and out.

HEATSTROKE

  1. Chemical cold pack or instant cold gel wrap. They can be placed against pressure points to aid in cooling the pet.
  2. Rubbing alcohol can be squirted onto the pads. As this can cause alcohol poisoning, talk to emergency veterinary personnel first.

POISONING

  1. Poison Control Center’s phone number is 888-426-4435.

 DO NOT ASSUME YOU SHOULD INDUCE VOMITING! Different poisons call for different protocols. What will help one situation will cause harm in another.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide to induce vomiting.
  2. Activated charcoal to absorb poison.
  3. Baking soda to absorb topical caustic material.
  4. Squirt bottle to administer treatment.
  5. Plastic baggie/latex gloves for vomit or stool sample.

BURNS

  1. Sterile solution for 1st and 2nd degree burns. DO NOT RINSE 3rd DEGREE BURNS. 3rd degree burns are characterized by the burn being  through the full thickness of the skin.
  2. Bandana/gauze to cover burns.

CHOKING

       1. Small flashlight with spare battery to check throat for debris.

       2. Plastic baggies/latex gloves for debris sample. 

MISCELLANEOUS

  1. Emergency muzzle.

If your kit is needed, your pet is probably in pain. Any pet in pain or being moved into pain can and will bite.

  1. Digital thermometer and petroleum jelly. They will thank you later.
  2. Blunt tip scissors.
  3. Tweezers.
  4. Eye dropper.
  5. Eye wash.
  6. Honey packets for hypoglycemic dogs.
  7. Survivor blanket will help keep pet warm due to shock in cold weather ONLY.  It should not be used in warm weather. 
  8. Glow sticks can be used to illuminate most common strains of ringworm. However, keep in mind this is not a full-proof diagnostic tool. 
  9. Smart Water or unflavored Pedialyte will help to re-hydrate stressed pets. Pedialyte must be unflavored because the other varieties contain artificial sweeteners.
  10. Photos of me WITH my dogs. The photo will establish ownership should I become separated from my dog(s) while hiking or traveling.
  11. Latex gloves to protect from zoonotics.
  12. Constricting band. I live in an area with poisonous snakes. If the bite occurs on an extremity, then place the constricting band after the wound. It will help to slow down the venom. Remove any collars from the pet. Intense body swelling can occur.

These items are in my kit because they suit my needs. Your kit should suit your needs. A good source for some of the harder items on this list can be found at www.kvvetsupply.com.


PET FIRST AID KITS VER. 3

What’s so important about pet first aid kits? Accidents aren’t planned, they can and do happen. Therefore, preparation is key. The American Animal Hospital Association states that 25% more pets could have been saved if only ONE pet first aid technique was applied before veterinary treatment. First aid means the difference between life and death, between temporary and permanent disability and between a short recuperation and a long recovery. A pet first aid kit plays a vital role.

I recommend taking the time putting your own kit together. If you choose to buy a pre-packaged kit, verify the contents suit your needs. In addition, replace items when used and check expiration dates on a regular basis.

What’s in my kit? I keep the contents in a large, denim Tinkerbell bag. Aside from Tink being the “bomb”, the bag is convenient to move from location to location. Other options include fishing (tackle) and craft boxes, which have plenty of compartments for storage. Suggested items are listed by category. There is some overlap between categories.

BLEEDING AND WOUNDS

  1. Adhesive tape.
  2. Gauze pads.
  3. Gauze rolls.
  4. Vet wrap.
  5. Cotton roll. This is used for head and large area wounds.
  6. Non-stick gauze.
  7. Antibiotic cream.
  8. Providone Iodine ointment.
  9. Sanitary napkins. They are used to soak up excess blood. 
  10. Bandanas/triangular bandages. They can be used for splinting fractures and covering wounds. In addition, they can be used to aid a dog in walking by taking the pressure off of an injured limb.
  11. Paint stirrers can be used for splinting.
  12. Sealed sterile solution for flushing wounds. An unsealed bottle is no longer sterile, nor is bottled water.
  13. 0.2% chlorohexidine rinse.  Used to rinse out wounds. The 0.2% is important. Less than that is not effective and more can cause cellular damage. I no longer use alcohol or hydrogen peroxide to flush wounds. Alcohol stings and hydrogen peroxide damages cellular tissue. In addition, both will slow healing.
  14. Nexaband. Your vet can demonstrate the right way to use this product. It is important that the wound is properly cleaned and dried first. Never use Nexaband on bite wounds.

ANAPHYLACTIC SHOCK, ALLERGIC REACTIONS AND INSECT BITES

  1. Premeasured dose of LIQUID gel antihistamine as determined by your vet.
  2. Safety pin.

The safety pin is used to puncture a hole in the liquid gel. It is then squirted onto the tongue of the pet. This is the easiest and most effective way to administer an antihistamine.

  1. Plastic card for flicking out bee stingers. Do not tweeze them out as you only inject more venom into the pet. Place the card under the stinger and lift up and out.

HEATSTROKE

  1. Chemical cold pack or instant cold gel wrap. They can be placed against pressure points to aid in cooling the pet.
  2. Rubbing alcohol can be squirted onto the pads. As this can cause alcohol poisoning, talk to emergency veterinary personnel first.

POISONING

  1. Poison Control Center’s phone number is 888-426-4435.

 DO NOT ASSUME YOU SHOULD INDUCE VOMITING! Different poisons call for different protocols. What will help one situation will cause harm in another.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide to induce vomiting.
  2. Activated charcoal to absorb poison.
  3. Baking soda to absorb topical caustic material.
  4. Squirt bottle to administer treatment.
  5. Plastic baggie/latex gloves for vomit or stool sample.

BURNS

  1. Sterile solution for 1st and 2nd degree burns. DO NOT RINSE 3rd DEGREE BURNS. 3rd degree burns are characterized by the burn being  through the full thickness of the skin.
  2. Bandana/gauze to cover burns.

CHOKING

       1. Small flashlight with spare battery to check throat for debris.

       2. Plastic baggies/latex gloves for debris sample. 

MISCELLANEOUS

  1. Emergency muzzle.

If your kit is needed, your pet is probably in pain. Any pet in pain or being moved into pain can and will bite.

  1. Digital thermometer and petroleum jelly. They will thank you later.
  2. Blunt tip scissors.
  3. Tweezers.
  4. Eye dropper.
  5. Eye wash.
  6. Honey packets for hypoglycemic dogs.
  7. Survivor blanket will help keep pet warm due to shock in cold weather ONLY.  It should not be used in warm weather. 
  8. Glow sticks can be used to illuminate most common strains of ringworm. However, keep in mind this is not a full-proof diagnostic tool. 
  9. Smart Water or unflavored Pedialyte will help to re-hydrate stressed pets. Pedialyte must be unflavored because the other varieties contain artificial sweeteners.
  10. Photos of me WITH my dogs. The photo will establish ownership should I become separated from my dog(s) while hiking or traveling.
  11. Latex gloves to protect from zoonotics.
  12. Constricting band. I live in an area with poisonous snakes. If the bite occurs on an extremity, then place the constricting band after the wound. It will help to slow down the venom. Remove any collars from the pet. Intense body swelling can occur.

These items are in my kit because they suit my needs. Your kit should suit your needs. A good source for some of the harder items on this list can be found at www.kvvetsupply.com.


Pet Emergency Preparedness Kits

One of the many lessons we should have learned from Hurricane Katrina is that everyone needs an emergency preparedness plan that include their pets. Even though more than 8,000 animals were rescued, reunited or REHOMED, many families lost their rescued pets because they could not be identified and returned to them. A pet emergency preparedness kit is an integral part of that plan.

A pet emergency preparedness kit should be ready to grab and go. If faced with an emergency evacuation, you will not have the time to look for those items that are vital to your pet’s survival.  Check items with expiration dates regularly and rotate when necessary. A backpack or small duffle bag will work well as a kit. You should keep it with your first aid kit.

Your kit should include:

1.    Emergency contact card. The card should contain current phone numbers as well as an out of area contact. Phone lines and other means of communication can be affected by an emergency. If you become separated from your pets, your out of area contact may be the only way you are reunited with your loved ones.

2.    An extra set of collars and leashes. A well identified pet has a better chance of returning home. Contact information on the tags should be current and readable. Microchip and tattoo registries cannot help if you are not in their databases anymore. Keep the membership updated.

3.    Health Record. Your veterinarian will issue a health certificate upon request. It contains general information and vaccine history. Copies of diagnostic tests, results and prescription information are recommended for pets with chronic health conditions. It will allow your pet treatment with an unfamiliar veterinarian.

4.    A months’ supply of medications. This is a rotated item. Veterinary medications may be hard to come by in an emergency. After Hurricane Katrina, for example, vet hospital’s medical inventories were commandeered. That means their medical supplies and medications were used to treat people.  In ANY emergency situation, the protocol is “people over pets”. Certain medications, such as Insulin, need refrigeration. Cold bags are available at most outdoor stores and supermarkets.

5.    A laminated photo of you WITH your pets. This photo establishes ownership.

6.    Foot protection. If there is ground contamination, they will prevent absorption of toxic materials through your pet’s pads.

7.    A months’ supply of food. This is a rotated item and is particularly important if your pet is on a special diet. Like medications, pet food may be hard to come by in an emergency.

8.    Bottled Smart Water or unflavored Pedialyte. An evacuation or emergency is a very stressful event. Replacing lost electrolytes can prevent shock.

9.    Collapsible food and water dishes. They take up very little space.

10.   Sanitation and cleaning supplies. This includes waterless sanitizers, paper towels, and poop bags for dogs and a litter pan for cats. A Frisbee makes a good litter pan.

11.   Anything that has the “smell of home” on it. A toy, unwashed pillow or blanket. It will give your pet comfort.

If faced with an evacuation, take your pets with you. You cannot assume that you will be home in a few hours. Plan a route that includes pet-friendly evacuation locations. This could include boarding kennels, pet-friendly hotels and family members’ home outside your immediate area. Practice loading your pets into crates and your vehicle. You don’t want them frightened should the real deal happen. You can also start a buddy system with a trusted neighbor. If you are away from home, then your buddy can evacuate your pets.

The Boy Scouts said it best.” Always be prepared. “When natural and man-made disasters occur, our pets can’t prepare for themselves. We need to do it for them.

 

Note: United Animal Nations sells a Personal Animal Disaster Planning Handbook at their store. It can be ordered for $3 at www.uan.org/store.


Pet First Aid Kits Ver.2.0

What’s so important about pet first aid kits? Accidents aren’t planned, they can and do happen. Therefore, you need to be prepared. According to the American Animal Hospital Association, 25% more pets could have been saved if only ONE pet first aid technique was applied prior to veterinary treatment. First aid means the difference between life and death, between temporary and permanent disability and between a short recuperation and a long recovery. A pet first aid kit plays a vital role.

I recommend that you take the time to put your own kit together. If you choose to buy a pre-packaged kit, verify the contents suit your needs. In addition, you should replace items when used and check expiration dates on a regular basis.

What’s in my kit? I keep the contents in a large, denim Tinkerbell bag. Aside from Tink being the “bomb”, the bag is convenient to move from location to location. Other options include fishing (tackle) and craft boxes, which have plenty of compartments for storage. Suggested items are listed by category. You will notice some overlap.

BLEEDING/WOUND INJURIES

1.       Adhesive tape.

2.       Gauze pads.

3.       Gauze rolls.

4.       Vet wrap.

5.       Rubbing alcohol to clean out wounds. Keep in a sealed bottle- unsealed bottles have a tendency to leak leaving you with an empty bottle.

6.       Hydrogen peroxide in a sealed bottle. It is used to clean out bite wounds specifically. Hydrogen peroxide will damage surrounding tissue. However, its benefits outweigh its disadvantages. Its effervescent properties help to clean pus and cellular debris from bite wounds.

7.       Antibiotic cream.

8.       Providone Iodine ointment.

9.       Sanitary napkins. They are used to soak up excess blood.

10.   Bandanas/triangular bandages. They can be used for splinting fractures and covering wounds. In addition, they can be used to aid a dog in walking by taking the pressure off of an injured limb.

11.   Paint stirrers can be used for splinting.

12.   Sealed sterile solution for flushing wounds. Unsealed bottles are no longer sterile, nor is bottled water.

ANAPHYLACTIC SHOCK, ALLERGIC REACTIONS AND INSECT BITES

1.       Premeasured dose of LIQUID gel antihistamine as determined by your vet.

2.       Safety pin.

The safety pin is used to puncture a hole in the liquid gel. It is then squirted onto the tongue of the pet. This is the easiest and most effective way to administer an antihistamine.

3.       Plastic card for flicking out bee stingers. Do not tweeze them out as you will only inject more venom into the pet. Place the card under the stinger and lift up and out.

HEAT STROKE

1.       Chemical cold pack or instant cold gel wrap. They can be placed against pressure points to aid in cooling the pet.

2.       Rubbing alcohol can be squirted onto the pads. As this can cause alcohol poisoning, you should first talk to emergency veterinary personnel.

POISONING

1.       Poison Control Center’s phone number is 888-426-4435.

 DO NOT ASSUME YOU SHOULD INDUCE VOMITING! Different poisons call for different protocols. What will help one situation will cause harm in another.

2.       Hydrogen peroxide to induce vomiting.

3.       Activated charcoal to absorb poison.

4.       Baking soda to absorb topical caustic material.

5.       Squirt bottle to administer treatment.

6.       Plastic baggie/latex gloves for vomit or stool sample.

BURNS

1.       Sterile solution for 1st and 2nd degree burns. DO NOT RINSE 3rd DEGREE BURNS. 3rd degree burns are characterized by the burn being through the full thickness of the skin.

2.       Bandana/gauze to cover burns.

CHOKING

       1. Small flashlight with spare battery to check throat for debris.

       2. Plastic baggies/latex gloves for debris sample.

MISCELLANEOUS

1.       Emergency muzzle.

If you need to use your kit, your pet is probably in pain. Any pet in pain or being moved into pain can and will bite.

2.       Digital thermometer and petroleum jelly. They will thank you later.

3.       Blunt tip scissors.

4.       Tweezers.

5.       Eye dropper.

6.       Eye wash.

7.       Honey packets for hypoglycemic dogs.

8.       Survivor blanket will help keep pet warm due to shock in cold weather ONLY.  It should not be used in warm weather.

9.       Glow sticks can be used to illuminate most common strains of ringworm. However, keep in mind this is not a full-proof diagnostic tool.

10.   Smart Water or unflavored Pedialyte will help to re-hydrate stressed pets. Pedialyte must be unflavored because the other varieties contain artificial sweeteners.

11.   Photos of me WITH my dogs. The photo will establish ownership should I become separated from my dog(s) while hiking or traveling.

12.   Latex gloves to protect from zoonotics.

13.   Constricting band. I live in an area with poisonous snakes. If the bite occurs on an extremity, then place the constricting band after the wound. It will help to slow down the venom. Remove any collars from the pet. Intense body swelling can occur.

These items are in my kit because they suit my needs. Your kit should suit your needs.


First Aid Kit for Hikers

While hiking through the woods or playing at a dog park, you do not want to haul around a suitcase for your possible first aid needs. You need something that will fit in a fanny pack or camera case. Before you start out, it's always a good idea to do a snout to tail assesment. It will establish a baseline for when you return from your walk. It will also determine if there are any injuries that might be exacerbated by strenous activity. You should do the same on your return to check for ticks, burrs, insidious foxtails and any injuries sustained during your outing that may have gone unnoticed.

Since we have limited space, we do want some of these items to do double duty.

1.Roll of gauze or vet wrap.

2.Gauze pads.

3.Extra bandanas. They can used to splint fractures or as a sling to help walk out an injured pet.

4.Sterile eye wash in a sealed bottle. This can be used for eye irritants and to flush out a wound. Always remember that bottled water is not sterile.

5.Hydrogen peroxide in a travel size sealed bottle. It can be used to induce vomiting.

Unsealed bottles have a way of becoming empty bottles.

6. Novalsan to clean out wounds.

7. A photo of you and your dog. It will establish ownership should you become separated from your dog and someone else finds him. A well identified dog that has become lost has a better chance of coming home.

8.Liquid gel benadryl and a safety pin. The fastest way to get an antihistamine into your dogs system in case of an allergic reaction or anaphylatic shock, is to poke a hole into the liquid caps and squirt it directly onto the tongue.

9.A plastic card to flick out stingers. Using a tweezer will only inject more poison into your dog.

10.Antibiotic cream

11. Bandaids for you.

12. Fold up water container. They should be able to drink water to prevent dehydration. They are available as small as a credit card.

13. Constricting band. This is important if you are hiking in an area with poisonous snakes.

14.Puplight. This is a LED lighted collar as strong as a flashlight. It will enable you to see during dusk/dawn walks.It will also make your dog more visible.

Happy hiking and remember not to overdo it for either of you.


Pet First Aid Kits

Why do you need a pet first aid kit?

Beth and I have collectively groomed for over a quarter century. We know that accidents can and will happen! During that time we have used our kits countless times, sometimes for pets and sometimes for people. In the last year, I used my kit 4 times.

1. Reno, one of my dogs went into anaphylactic shock after being bit by a spider.
2. Myself, after being bit by a dog. (See last article)
3. Beth had an allergic reaction to something she ate.
4. My hubby cut his hand.

Items in the kit are interchangeable between people and pets.

What is important about a kit?

1. That you have one.
2. You must know what's in your kit. There is nothing worse, then experiencing an emergency, tearing off the cellophane of your brand new kit, only to discover you don't have half of what you need.
3. The kit should be well stocked and up to date. Items must be replaced when used and expiration dates kept current. (If you buy a pre-packaged kit, do an inventory and see what needs to be added.)

So, what's in my kit? I keep the items in a large, denim Tinkerbelle bag. Aside from Tink being the "bomb", the bag is convenient when moving from place to place. Other options are fishing (tackle boxes) or craft boxes, which have plenty of compartments for storage.

The items are listed by category, you will notice that some items overlap.

Bleeding/Wound Injuries:

• Adhesive tape
• Gauze pads
• Gauze rolls
• Vet wrap
• Rubbing alcohol sealed bottle
• Hydrogen peroxide sealed bottle

Unsealed bottles have a tendency to leak leaving you with an empty bottle.

• Antibiotic cream
• Providone iodine ointment
• Sanitary napkins (soak up excess blood)
• Bandanas/triangular bandages

These cloths can be used for splinting fractures. They can assist carrying a dog by taking pressure off of an injured limb.

• Sterile solution sealed for flushing injuries.

Unsealed bottles are no longer sterile. Bottled water is NOT a sterile solution.

• Squirt bottle- once used replace

Anaphylactic Shock, Allergic reactions, insect bites:

• Liquid gel antihistamine
• Safety pin

The safety pin is used to puncture a hole in the liquid gel to squirt the antihistamine into the mouth. That is the easiest and most effective method for a layperson to administer antihistamine.

• Plastic card for flicking out stingers.

Do not tweeze them out as you will inject more venom into the host.

Heat Stroke:

• Rubbing alcohol squirted onto pads aids in cooling pet.

Poisoning:
• Poison Control Center 888-426-4435.

A note about the following items. DO NOT ASSUME YOU SHOULD INDUCE VOMITING!!! Different situations call for different treatments. You must call poison control first and then follow their directives.

• Hydrogen peroxide to induce vomiting
• Activated charcoal to absorb poison
• Baking soda to absorb topical caustic material
• Squirt bottle to administer treatment(s)
• Plastic baggies for vomit or stool samples for vet

Burns:
• Sterile solution for 1st and 2nd degree burns.
(Do NOT rinse 3rd degree burns.)
• Bandanas/ Gauze to cover burns

Choking:

• Small flashlight with spare battery to check throat for debris
• Plastic baggies for vomit sample

Miscellaneous:

• Emergency muzzle

If you need to use your kit, your pet is probably in pain. Any pet in pain or being moved into pain, can and will bite!!!

• Digital thermometer and petroleum jelly (They will thank you later)
• Blunt tip scissors
• Tweezers
• Eye dropper
• Honey packets for diabetic/hypoglycemic dogs
• Survivor blanket will help keep a dog warm if it's in shock. Not to be used when shock is caused by a heat stroke. Can also be used to carry a small to medium dog.
• Black light/glow sticks can be used to illuminate the most common strains of ringworm. This is not a full-proof diagnostic tool. It is to be used as an aid. Glow sticks have the advantage of being disposable.
• Photos of me with my dogs. The photo establishes ownership should I become separated from my dog(s) while hiking or traveling.
• Unflavored Pedialyte used to re-hydrate stressed pets. It must me unflavored because the other varieties contain artificial sweeteners which can be toxic to pets.

That's my kit. If you have any suggestions or ideas, please let us know. We are always looking for new and inventive items for the first aid kit.