Tip for Groomers Using Paper Appointment Books

~Just a tip to share for those groomers who still schedule in a paper book. 

Many of you have probably already thought of this so perhaps it’s a better tip for newbie groomers. 

I bought these plastic coated flags to secretly color code & flag client cards for special issues like biting, owner stays, or no call/no shows, etc in a way that got my attention but still didn’t lead on as to what the flag meaning was in front of the client.

 

They are proving helpful to also use in my appointment book to mark out the number of weeks from the current day so that when clients pre-book in the regular rotation it’s easy to find a specific week they will want.  No more counting & flipping pages (and maybe miscounting because you hurried!) while the client waits. 

All you do is back up the tabs at the end of each week or to start your new work week.

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To Shave Or Not To Shave?

I have had quite a few messages coming in from various outlets asking me for my opinion on this recently shared article online.

 

https://clipyourdog.wordpress.com/2018/06/25/shaving-double-coated-breeds/

 

 

There are really only a few *minor statements that I don’t entirely agree with.  For instance, the types of hair on a dog not just being (2) guard hair or undercoat hair, but in fact there being a third type that is sometimes referred to as “tertiary” or secondary undercoat by various educators within our industry. This resides most commonly within the Nordic breeds of dogs and is a lesser hair coat type designed specifically for thermoregulation and adding additional loft and insulation for the body. There are also two types of tactile hairs interspersed within the canine and feline hair coat that serve a definite purpose in the relating of real-time perception and the adaptive systems of the pet and how it relates to its immediate environment. These are important as well.

The porosity of this third undercoat hair coat type and the density with which it creates the overall hair coat of the dog is why it has a propensity to really make a mess of things when you clip certain breeds down short all at once.

I do also feel that undercoat hair sheds much more cyclically than two times a year. This again relies just as much on not just the breed of dog, but within that category, it’s further individual genetic code, living/care  environment, as well as other factors including general physical health, medical and vaccination protocols, etc. So again, proof of the point that this is a case-by-case scenario.

Clipping down a dog with ample undercoat still has an eventual unforeseeable outcome. But this professional decision can be entered into best when you have as much factual information and objective knowledge under your belt as possible.

I am grateful for this article because our industry NEEDS more open minded discussion and less steadfast devotion to one side of the fence or the other. I understand the mines interest in deciding a black-and-white yes or no on anything that is important to our profession and our liability they are in, but as with many other important aspects of life, the important things can rarely be entirely black and white. 😉

I ask you to *please take the time to read through this lengthy article, (you really can’t effectively “skim” it) take mental notes, and bookmark it to hold onto for referral back to, should you have any questions later on.

 

For those who asked for it, my professional opinion is that clipping down a dog with ample undercoat must be done carefully because there are a host of possible outcomes all of which *you have a certain amount of liability for in the event of an adverse effect as a professional business/caregiver. 

The same goes for Terrier (and TerrierX breeds, all of which cycle coat far different than any other breed class) breeds whose clippering can also alter coat type and the overall health of the dog!

You may find yourself to decide an absolute one way or the other just to keep things simple for your work each day. 

And that decision is entirely individual as much as it is for the pet on your table in front of you.

I will say in my salon that absolutely no dog gets clipped down shorter than a #4F on a double coated breed. And that NONE of that clipping is done until after the dog has been completely bathed, completely dried, and brushed out with its *full natural coat length FIRST*.

Clipping down this type of coat is always done as a final step process which only is completed when I have cared sufficiently for ALL of the coat that the dog initially came in with. 

If you need clarification on that process that I enact at my own salon, and which I recommend within my certification material, please contact me and I will happily delve deeper.

🌹

 

Article on spay-induced coat changes:

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-3164.2008.00652.x

 

Supportive article on thermal animal imaging:

https://helda.helsinki.fi/bitstream/handle/10138/45311/vainionpaa_dissertation.pdf?sequence=1

 

 

 


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Grooming The Difficult Dog, by Barb Hoover

 

From time to time a WONDERFUL piece of work and an IMPORTANT learning opportunity will come across my desk. 

And it just happened again!!

 

We all know groomers can come under fire through media. And we all know many of us try to head off bad things from happening by working together to be proactive against animals getting hurt or yet another media blitz against groomers being forged- especially by trying to educate other groomers.

Our industry is filled with talented and intelligent people who have so much to share towards the betterment of all of our work we do each day, and to really help the pets that we care for.

 

I want to share with you a book that I got to read and just HAD to get the word out about it.

I recommend this book to EVERYONE who works with animals all day; I hope you’ll support Barb Hoover’s great work and 

READ THIS BOOK!

 

🌹

http://www.lulu.com/shop/barb-hoover/the-difficult-dog/paperback/product-23685173.html


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Borrowed from a chemical safety & info fact site- not just someone’s personal blog-

These are lists of what’s commonly in shampoos, conditioners and topical hairsprays. 

Reading through the products and familiarizing yourself with them can help you to recognize their purpose when you do see them on your pet grooming product labels. Learning about these ingredients will help you to recognize when a product ingredient is complete or partial. 🌹

Shampoos:

http://www.cosmeticsinfo.org/products/shampoos-and-rinses

 

Conditioners:

http://www.cosmeticsinfo.org/products/hair-conditioners

 

Hair Sprays:

 

http://www.cosmeticsinfo.org/products/hair-sprays


Practicing Holism In the Pet Salon

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We all know that grooming is hard work.

And even holistic grooming isn't all sunshine and rainbows. Sometimes pets are outright difficult, aggressive and scared. And sometimes human clients can be the same! LOL

Sometimes all you can do for a pet in the timeframe of its visit is to work quickly and quietly and gently to finish as much as you can for them, and then just let them get back home.

But each day that you come in is a new chance at giving a pet some happiness. Giving a pet some relief from a chronic ailment. Giving a pet owner the knowledge and power to help better the life of their pet.

So even the most difficult of days is still always lined with opportunity of achieving something great- no matter how small it may seem at the time.

Let's look at some of the foundational ways you as a groomer can accomplish working holistically each day.

Remember that because you are part of a network of perceptions and experiences that the pets who come to you for care have, that your energy and mindset are picked up on no matter what. You can fake being relaxed or focused, and you can't fake being happy and kind. At least with animals you can't. So be true to yourself, be conscious of who and what you are and what you are doing... take care of you, and that care will naturally ripple out every day into your work and interactions.

*Rest in your down time.

~ literally MAKE yourself rest if you struggle with this. Learn practices to settle your mind and body, look into breathing exercises and ways to attain better sleep quality.

*Put some good food in your tummy each day!

~ feed your mind while you feed your body, and DON'T skip snacks or meals or eat junk food because you prioritize yourself out of your schedule. Especially not if you expect your mind and body to be there for you when you need it. You've got just one body in this life and its with you til the end, so don't cut your end off short!

*Set your mind and your energy on having a good day.

~ take time to focus your mind on what you envision to be a successful day. Be open to and at peace with the possibility that how that actually plays out may be different than exactly what you had in mind.

~ if you meditate, take some time before leaving for work, or in your car before going in, or even in the salon to do that. If you feel comfortable meditating right at work, believe me, that positive energy fills your works space, and its fresh in your mind as you begin to work for the day. If you share Reiki, open for Reiki and share it with your work space before opening. Keep that funnel open and share it with the pets you work on thru the day as well if you feel like you should.

If you do neither of these things you can still stop for a second to purposely decide to have a good day, let fall away whatever negativity may have happened in your morning or what might be going on outside of work. Take a few deep breaths and then welcome the start of the day.

*Create your work environment.

~find those things that bring you an element of relaxation or peacefulness, and subtle reminders of happiness in your personal work space. Surround yourself with the things that bring out your most focused and energized self so that you're at your best while you are busy working.

Some brief things you can consider in your work environment:

Lighting: Be sure you have adequate lighting to work, no glaring or too much back light on those dark colored coats. Be sure to look into it being the best type of lighting for your eyes and your energy levels as poor lighting causes eye fatigue and stress and more.  As well, good lighting creates atmosphere and everyone picks up on that including the pets!

~More to come on light and color therapy in subsequent blogs!

Fully functional equipment and tools that are easy on your body: Don't skimp and treat yourself well when you can, be sure everything is clean and in good repair so that you can work efficiently and be good to your body and mind.

Air quality: Keeping the air clean creates better health and safety for everyone who visits you as well as yourself, as well poor air quality clouds the brain and causes fatigue.

Scents: A good smelling shop definitely registers with every client coming through your door. And it registers with you even if you don't realize it. Keeping accidents cleaned up promptly, not cleaning with acrid or harsh chemicals, and not dousing yourself in too much perfume helps remove scents that can be stressful to pets.  Consider possibly looking into aromatherapy which can help lessen stress and balance the emotional state of both you and the animals that come in.

Sounds: If you prefer working in complete quiet, make that happen. Some days I relish in listening to the soft sounds of my scissors and the hum of my clippers in between the breathing of the pet on my table or the soft little noises they make. Listening to these sounds gives one a sense of being in the moment.

If you prefer certain music through the day, get that going as part of your opening routine. You may find that music interests change from day to day or hour to hour depending on your emotional state, but across the board it should be music that is not bombarding or overwhelming to a pet's distinct and very attuned senses. The pets, even though they may not directly appreciate the music, appreciate the tones and vibrations and certainly they pick up on the energy you exchange when you are happily humming along.

Traffic flow: Be sure you have secure space to work in without people intruding. Be sure that your area is organized and free of clutter or things which inhibit your free movement and being able to position yourself properly while working.

 We'll discuss more on creating your working atmosphere in later blogs.

*Pull up your client cards or files for the day and get a good feel for who'll be coming in. Envision each pet and its owner and place intent on having a good visit with each one. Look at your notes for each dog. I'm big on writing down any changes in physical and behavioral things with pets to follow up on, as well I write down things like vacations or events a client might be having at a certain visit and then ask about those things when they come in again. Clients appreciate that you cared enough to remember that stuff.

*Take time at each pet's arrival to greet them genuinely and happily. A warm welcome can really turn things around if a client is having a tough day of their own. Once they're welcomed, take the time to ask them about updates or changes with pets or to get all of the foundational info on their pet if they are new. Look and feel the pet over thoroughly.

*Throughout the day as you work, whenever you have just a moment, stop and really LOOK at and LISTEN to the pet there in front of you. Take them in. Consider their simple being. Listen to their breathing. Look at their actions and personality and appreciate that about them as a living creature. Do this ESPECIALLY if they are being difficult. Watch their outward signals and amend your movements and touch to be as little distressing as possible. Remember ALWAYS that pets do not harbor ill will nor are they making a standoff with you when they are being difficult. Almost always stress or pain is the root of acting out. That can come from a variety of reasons, but none of it has to do with you taking it personally. Sometimes certain pets just don't *want* to be groomed...but we do have a job to do, so with them just do it as kindly and quickly as you safely can.

Consider these things when you are doing a head to tail assessment on a pet:

-Run your fingers slowly through the coat and feel it and look at it. Look at the skin beneath and take note of any abnormal or "suspect" issues (oiliness, flakiness, lackluster brittle coat, sparse areas of coat, lumps or bumps and lesions. Also feel for "hot" areas as you move along the pet's body- areas like joints especially where high warmth can signal irritation or inflammation- that could mean tenderness and should be in the back of your mind as you groom that pet.

Once you've examined the pets skin and coat and structure, take a careful and quick sweep of their eyes, ears and teeth for anything suspect that catches your eye and be sure to address that with the owner while they are there. Remember that ALL things are connected along the circuitry board that makes up the network of systems inside a pet. If one thing is ailing or symptomatic, then likely that is rooted somewhere else. Consider that connection when you are grooming and tailor your care around those issues.

Being thorough in your exam of the pet and talking kindly with the owner builds great repoire and opinion of you professionally if you communicate from an honest and down to earth place of helping. Being too insistent, vague or condescending will quickly cost you the respect of a client and limit the positive impact you could have in a pet's life. And don't make things up or guess! Never, ever, be afraid to say "I don't know" when it comes to seeing something concerning with a pet. Just as quickly you can ruin a relationship by coming off as a know it all or diagnosing. That is NEVER our job. Noticing things and relaying info to the owner puts them in the driver seat of their pet's well being, and giving that power to them often gains results when its done right.

It should be mentioned that working with a good veterinarian which is like minded in their practices will support the advice you give and not undermine your ability even though you're not actually a fellow vet. In fact, not only is it extremely important to any pet needing to attain better health to have a good working relationship with a vet or several vets, but referrals between you will add an entirely new facet to your business and your reputation!

But THAT"S another blog!

 


Licensing & Regulation For the Grooming Industry

PROFESSIONAL PET GROOMERS & STYLISTS ALLIANCE ANNOUNCES SHARED SAFETY AND SANITATION STANDARDS FOR PET GROOMING   National pet styling groups and allies come together to develop nationwide standards of care   LAS VEGAS, NV – Good pet grooming begins with good training and a relationship based on trust. During today’s morning session of the World Pet Association’s Groomer Supershow, the members of the Professional Pet Groomers & Stylists Alliance (PPGSA) announced the results of a year-long initiative to review and establish a set of best practices regarding safety and sanitation that will serve as a foundational building block for industry grooming standards.   Doug Poindexter, president of the World Pet Association, and representatives from International Pet Groomers, Inc., the International Society of Canine Cosmetologists and the National Dog Groomers Association of America, Inc. took the stage, flanked by additional association members. They described a protocol that includes standards for animal housing and handling, equipment, and facilities with a focus on safe operations and attentive animal care.   “This is a groundbreaking achievement,” said Poindexter. “We applaud all the groups that are working together to develop these important health and safety standards.”   Linda Easton, president of IPG, said, “We believe that providing groomers with education and industry standards about the safe and humane handling of pets can give them the mindset, tools and desire to provide exceptional service to all pets in their care.”   “The integration of a ‘Basic Standard of Pet Care’ into industry guidelines and policies will provide an indelible assurance of the well-being of the pets entrusted to professional pet groomers and stylists,” added ISCC executive director Pam Lauritzen. “It can become a mutually beneficial cornerstone of care.”   Jeffrey Reynolds, executive director of the NDGAA, added “We are proud and excited to be part of this coalition of pet grooming professionals who have come together to share our experience to create these basic standards of pet care. We are passionate about ensuring the safety of all pets while in the care of pet grooming professionals.”   Final language will be released at an upcoming national grooming exposition. Alliance members are committed to incorporating these standards into their own training and/or certification programs, ensuring that groomers and stylists are taught to the same standards irrespective of which program they pursue.   About the Professional Pet Groomers & Stylists Alliance The PPGSA was created to harness the experience and expertise of the three major national pet styling associations – IPG, ISCC and NDGA – to develop industry-wide best practices for pet grooming. In addition to these groups, members of the Alliance include trade groups such as the World Pet Association, the California Professional Pet Groomers Association, the New Jersey Pet Groomers Association and the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council, major retail partners such as Petco and PetSmart and pet care industry service providers such as the American Kennel Club, America’s Pet Registry, Inc. and Barkleigh. Alliance members meet regularly to review standards to ensure that they reflect current industry best practices. For more information, contact Mike Bober at (202) 309-3980 or mbober@pijac.org.
 

Monitoring HV Dryer Temperature

Just a friendly reminder for those groomers who are aware of the growing amount of burns and related injuries and pet deaths involving heated kennel dryers.
It should not be overlooked that we need to also be careful with how we are using our high velocity dryers with pets as well. Aside from needing to be careful around bodily orifices as well as the eyes and ears and mouth of a pet we also need to pay attention to how hot the air is upon the surface of the skin while you are drying. It is important to remember that if your heated air hurts against your skin, it definitely is hurting the pet. Be sure to sweep over the pet thoroughly and never leave the flow of air up close to the skin for very long.  
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I am not saying anything against any certain company in particular but I happen to have a ChallengeAir dryer that I ran this test on, and this is the temperature recording for the airflow after only five minutes. Very commonly we are using our dryers on a pet for over 15 minutes by the time they are completely dry. That means the temperature reading here after that length of time, could be even higher. Some dryers get even hotter than this.
Image1 - Copy
Please note that Dr. Mueller and Kirk's Small Animal Dermatology medical book states clearly that early-stage burning can happen at as little as 110°F. Use your high velocity dryers wisely!
 
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As well, always remember to monitor the ambient air temperature of your drying room. In addition to very warm air, having a high amount of humidity in the air creates a breathing and overheating risk quite quickly. Anything above 80F calls for a break to allow the pet and air within the room to cool. Keep your eyes on the pet for panting, wanting to lay down, or drooling as some of the first signs that nausea and imbalance can be present, which are part of the early stages of heat stroke.
Always offer a warm pet a drink of tepid water (not cold).

Grooming Industry Licensing & Regulations Update!

PROFESSIONAL PET GROOMERS & STYLISTS ALLIANCE ANNOUNCES SHARED SAFETY AND SANITATION STANDARDS FOR PET GROOMING National pet styling groups and allies come together to develop nationwide standards of care LAS VEGAS, NV – Good pet grooming begins with good training and a relationship based on trust. During today’s morning session of the World Pet Association’s Groomer Supershow, the members of the Professional Pet Groomers & Stylists Alliance (PPGSA) announced the results of a year-long initiative to review and establish a set of best practices regarding safety and sanitation that will serve as a foundational building block for industry grooming standards. Doug Poindexter, president of the World Pet Association, and representatives from International Pet Groomers, Inc., the International Society of Canine Cosmetologists and the National Dog Groomers Association of America, Inc. took the stage, flanked by additional association members. They described a protocol that includes standards for animal housing and handling, equipment, and facilities with a focus on safe operations and attentive animal care. “This is a groundbreaking achievement,” said Poindexter. “We applaud all the groups that are working together to develop these important health and safety standards.” Linda Easton, president of IPG, said, “We believe that providing groomers with education and industry standards about the safe and humane handling of pets can give them the mindset, tools and desire to provide exceptional service to all pets in their care.” “The integration of a ‘Basic Standard of Pet Care’ into industry guidelines and policies will provide an indelible assurance of the well-being of the pets entrusted to professional pet groomers and stylists,” added ISCC executive director Pam Lauritzen. “It can become a mutually beneficial cornerstone of care.” Jeffrey Reynolds, executive director of the NDGAA, added “We are proud and excited to be part of this coalition of pet grooming professionals who have come together to share our experience to create these basic standards of pet care. We are passionate about ensuring the safety of all pets while in the care of pet grooming professionals.” Final language will be released at an upcoming national grooming exposition. Alliance members are committed to incorporating these standards into their own training and/or certification programs, ensuring that groomers and stylists are taught to the same standards irrespective of which program they pursue. About the Professional Pet Groomers & Stylists Alliance The PPGSA was created to harness the experience and expertise of the three major national pet styling associations – IPG, ISCC and NDGA – to develop industry-wide best practices for pet grooming. In addition to these groups, members of the Alliance include trade groups such as the World Pet Association, the California Professional Pet Groomers Association, the New Jersey Pet Groomers Association and the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council, major retail partners such as Petco and PetSmart and pet care industry service providers such as the American Kennel Club, America’s Pet Registry, Inc. and Barkleigh. Alliance members meet regularly to review standards to ensure that they reflect current industry best practices. For more information, contact Mike Bober at (202) 309-3980 or mbober@pijac.org. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ At the All American Grooming Show coming up in August there will be a new informational meeting and discussion along with Teri Becker DiMarino releasing the basic guidelines that have been formed thus far on salon safety and sanitation. The exact date and time have not yet been released for this meeting but will soon, and I will update when they are. If you are attending, please be sure not to miss this meeting!

National Pet Grooming Day declared!

June 1st is officially declared: NATIONAL PET GROOMING DAY! The national holiday proposal, it's considerations, and formal initiatives have been filed by me here in Madison (I live just outside of our state capital), to local congressperson's office, and we will see how long it takes to actually become decreed. It could take quite some time, and I will keep you all posted. But in the meantime, I encourage all of my pet grooming friends to promote June 1st as their official National Pet Grooming Day, and share your banner to spread the word in any way you can!

Grooming The Lagotto Romagnolo

Paging through the breed by breed grooming entries here on PetGroomer.com, I noticed there were no entries on grooming the Lagotto. I happened to have one in the salon for grooming, so I thought I would share the basic grooming needed for this breed.

 

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Some brief history on this breed:

The Lagotto Romagnolo [laˈɡɔtto romaɲˈɲɔlo] is a breed of dog that comes from the Romagna sub-region of Italy. The name means "lake dog from Romagna," originating from the Italian word lago, meaning lake. Its traditional function is a gundog, specifically a water retriever. However, it is often used to hunt for truffles.

 

Some photos of Lagottos

Lagotto 3

Lagottos come in a variety of colors

Lagotto 1

This dog in physical character largely resembles the Portuguese Water Dog, but it is smaller in stature, and its coat is left much more rustic than the Portie. In fact, a coat containing matts is accepted in the show ring and by most educated Lagotto owners as part of their true coat characteristics. Of course, in the grooming salon, leaving matts in a coat is a big no-no. So, as groomers, we have the unusual task of completely grooming the dog, and then getting it to actually look quite UNgroomed as a final step before it is considered finished.

  Lagotto 2

Normally a nicely scissored and plush looking trim on a curly coated pet is what we are trying to achieve and what the owner would envision. But on a coat which is to be kept rustic or natural and not altered looking, as groomers we have to go over the dog as a final step and re-wet and hand squeeze the coat and then allow it to air dry to re-introduce the "marcelle" and the curl back into it. The stick straight results wanted for a Poodle's coat is not what you are going for. And the marcelling or natural wave desired in the jacket coat of a Kerry Blue Terrier is close to what you want to achieve, but the final trim on a Lagotto should be even much more curly, touseled and untidy. Doing this totally goes outside many of the comfort zones that most groomers find easy to turn a dog out as finished, and indeed, overcoming the final look of any tailored characteristic can prove surprisingly difficult.

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To begin on a pet dog, we must thoroughly wash the pet and carefully remove any deep solid matting from the coat to be sure the pet's skin is healthy beneath, and that the coat does not inhibit free physical movement. Before the bath I recommend removing only the matting that is so solid that you feel you cannot penetrate it with shampoo and water and result in the hair within the mat being clean. Leave the rest of any webbing or matting until after the bathing session for two reasons:

1. Doing so likely will cause coat damage

2. The coat has a natural ability through its genetic texture and density, to easily blow out loose matting and webbing during the HV drying session. This is easier on the dog and yourself to allow your equipment and topicals to loosen & remove what you would otherwise be relying on your hands and arms to manually do.

Once the coat is clean, completely dry and lofty, use a pin brush and comb to separate the coat nicely. If you use a slicker, be sure to use either a flexible head slicker, or a very soft touch and a pat & pull method.

Thoroughly clipper I wide sanitary trim on the groin of the dog, trim out the underarm area of the front legs, and clip well around the rectum.  Trim out the hair around the ear opening and where the ear rests on the side of the head to allow for plenty of air flow to the ear canal. And trim the pads nice and tight.

 

From here, based on the requested length the owner wanted, choose your blade or comb attachment length and clip the entire dog both body and legs into the same length. This breed calls for columnal shaped legs, but also uniform coat length over the entire dog with exception of the head. And with as active as these dogs are, minimal leg coat will prove in the best interest of everyone.

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Once the body and leg coat is fully clippered, go around the feet and shape them into soft round bevels, and be sure that the pads and perimeter of each paw is scissored tidy and tight.

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From here be sure that the tail is scissored into its characteristic *carrot shape*. There should be no plume or flag on the underside of the tail per breed standard. For this dog, I scissored the entire tail, but you can also use a longer clip comp attachment if the tail hair is nicely dense.

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 From there we move to the dog's head, which is finally the place where you can utilize your scissoring skills.

  IMG_8364

The breed calls for a round head and ears, and a muzzle with coat but in slightly shorter length than the hair on the head and cheeks.  It also calls for a round head where the ear hair doesn't extend past the length of the nose nor the cheek line. So you are trying to achieve a relatively round head similar to the Portie but with true circular shape instead of the slightly flat shape required of the top of the Portie head.

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To achieve this, I first clippered tightly the throat area and behind the line of the jaw to get this messy area short and even, and to add length to the neck. From there I scissored the head and across the tops of the ears, sides of the ckeeks, and then shaped the bottom of each each to blend it in with the sides of the head. And finally, I stretched the lower lips and scissored the flew tight and then thinnered across the stop area of each eye and around the eye to open the view of the eyes. You should be able t easily se the eyes of these dogs, but there should still be a slight awning of natural hair that sits across the brow so the "deer in the headlights" expression is avoided. This owner also requested that the beard be left longer than usual so you will notice that doing so creates more of a bell shaped head. Ideally, the head should be fully round and similar to a Cockapoo or teddy bear head expression.

IMG_8375

From there, as a final finishing step to the groom, I re-wet the dog's entire body and leg coat with a thorough misting of plain water and squeezed the water into the coat with my hands, and then put the dog into the kennel under a fan to allow it to finish by air drying. Remember to allow yourself extra time at the end of the groom to provide this finishing step and still get the dog back to its owner fully dried.  

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It is important to not use heavy coat conditioning sprays on this breed that will be left on between grooming visits because typically they are not groomed as often, and their guard coat to undercoat ratio coupled with the density of their coat and the type of natural oils their skin produces, proves to be adequate for what they need and you don't want a heavy conditioner left in the coat.

Happy Grooming!

 

Lagotto 4