Pet Stylist Health

A24C0D92-DA68-4595-B175-D4D7F078AE9F

Borrowed from a chemical safety & info fact site- not just someone’s personal blog-

These are lists of what’s commonly in shampoos, conditioners and topical hairsprays. 

Reading through the products and familiarizing yourself with them can help you to recognize their purpose when you do see them on your pet grooming product labels. Learning about these ingredients will help you to recognize when a product ingredient is complete or partial. 🌹

Shampoos:

http://www.cosmeticsinfo.org/products/shampoos-and-rinses

 

Conditioners:

http://www.cosmeticsinfo.org/products/hair-conditioners

 

Hair Sprays:

 

http://www.cosmeticsinfo.org/products/hair-sprays


The Society of Holistic Pet Stylists

A long time ago I began to feel that I was different.

Be nice! LOL

But seriously, I have always been a little different in my thinking, my outlook on most things, and especially I felt different in that I could never force myself to stay at a job for very long if I wasn't happy doing it. I struggled with leaving things at the door, with doing tasks that I felt didn't have lasting result, with feeling lost in a sea of faces, and most of all with just taking my paycheck and writing the rest off.

But luckily, I eventually found grooming.

Gratefully, I have been able to do a job that I love, and for that it rarely feels like work.

When I began grooming, I noticed right away that everyone worked just a bit differently, and that was rooted deeply in their general personality traits.

I groomed over the years with many, MANY different types of people, but I learned most of all about MYSELF.

I learned what I liked, what I couldn't tolerate, my strengths and weaknesses, to challenge myself to always think outside the box, and to never fear trying something different. I learned more about myself from the dogs I groomed each day than any other aspect of my grooming experiences. How I groomed began to define a very large part of who I was as a person. And to this day, it still does.

It is in honor of the time I've spent just pondering and watching the pets I groom, of the previously unimaginable awe of a pet's unconditional love I have come to know, and of all the wonders an animal can bring to your life, that I still find myself so passionate and overflowing with joy that I find in grooming.

In honor of the lessons I have learned, of how "different" I am so happy to be, that I have worked so hard to try to encourage other groomers and animal lovers to NEVER ignore that little voice inside themselves, and to ALWAYS follow your curiousities... that I have worked to form a new and wonderful association for groomers that may have also always felt "a little different".

Of these honors, I am very grateful and happy to announce,

The Society Of Holistic Pet Stylists.

Logo

Our new society promises to be like nothing our industry has ever seen, a breath of fresh air, and a place for all stylists to come together to learn and share and forever change our industry through doing great things.

Together with Mary Oquendo, Barbara Bird, Daryl Connor, Lori Gulling, Sue Palmer and Melissa Jepson, we are creating an entirely new learning format and an entirely new opportunity in skill sets for the grooming industry.

Please visit our website for more information, or contact me directly with your interest!

www.HolisticPetStylists.com or www.HolisticDogGroomers.com

 

 

 


Until You've Walked a Mile In Their Shoes...

You see it time & time again. In posts and threads online, in group meeting discussions and amongst friends in the same line of work....groomers complaining about how poorly their clients care for their pets. Groomers not being able to let go of the frustration and anger towards clients over how little they care or know about grooming, how little respect they feel they get, or how little money they make to deal with the level of issues they see walk into their businesses. Groomers having to vent negativity on a regular basis. Bubbling over with anxiety and stress until it spills out on those around them.

Woman-pulling-out-hair2

Few people will be brave enough to pop in as a voice of reason and remind people that they are the one who dictates their pay rate as well as their own level of enjoyment in their work, no one else.

When I see or hear this stuff, I'm usually one of the first to state my personal opinion and then quickly and quietly exit stage left....

Recently there have been multiple "reminder posts" from long time groomers that had been there, done that, asking disgruntled and stressed out groomers to take charge of their own destiny and take that energy and put it into more proactive efforts.

I couldn't agree more..

I've got to tell you, I'm personally thankful this level of angst is a minority.

And both in person and online, with all of the trade shows and classes, or groups and chat rooms sitting there at your disposal, it is easy to notice that it seems that certain groomers often go through these levels of contempt or frustration in what comes to be to the quiet onlooker as definite cycles...

Imagine that....

LOL

It should be mentioned that with the 5 minutes of fame you get from being the "flavor of the day" online, or getting cheers from fellow naysayers, its really self defeating to your own work, and to the work of others in the industry you call home, to participate in melodrama or endless ranting. Instead, in the best interest of your own emotional well being, those standing on the outside of the mob invite you to eagerly run away at full throttle from any negative venting that is laden with nastiness.

Remember, people who are always intolerant or gossipy, will eventually bestow their gifts upon you.

But I digress...

I'm quite sure that every industry deals with it share of Negative Nellies, but perhaps because groomers are truly a passionate and creative bunch, or because since we are unregulated, social and news media coverage of bad situations are allowed to get out of hand pretty quickly with little recourse, we are especially hard hit by those who behave badly or with bad poor forethought. 

 I wanted to write this blog to discuss these peronality types and to shed some light on the thought process (or lack thereof) behind being reacitve and negative towards clients. My purpose is not at all to shame or ostrecize, not to bring poor behavior into the limelight, nor to emphasis a negative (but small) aspect of the people who work each day to comprise our industry.

Instead I'd hoped to maybe offer a different viewpoint to those who may just have their toes hanging over the edge of "going to the dark side" and struggling with not getting caught in the undertow of frustration. And especially to help our new groomers- who are just now learning the ropes of their profession- to understand that negativity and dishonesty is not the norm, and it is not well received by industry peers who seek to bring our work to a higher level or respect and consideration from pet owners and governing bodies.

Those of us who have been grooming for a very long time, have had successful businesses, and who speak and write to fans and peers who come to us for knowledgeable advice, have groomed in our salons most happily for many years. We have learned through personal experience that you must find the joy in what you do in order to do it for the right reasons. We have created a lengthy list of faithful and respectful clients by cultivating mutual tolerance, respect and appreciation. And we have been the designers of both a profitable and fulfilling career. 

If you are one of those groomers who finds yourself often upset through the day, your grooming day drawing to a close with yet another sequence of frustrating events, I would ask you to take an honest look at how you felt when you came in to work. Because unless some truly altering event happens, it is surely still the way you'll feel when you finish work, if not worse.

Some honest questions for the consistantly frustrated stressed out and angry groomer:

Why was it again that you got into this line of work?

Because you love animals?

Do you realize that its the animals that lose out when you allow your emotions to get the best of you?

You do realize that part of our job description requires that we fully realize that we do not own all of our the pets that come to see us? That part of our job in all fairness should be fixing mistakes and kindly educating and having patience with other humans just as much as that dog on the table in front of you?

And you do realize, don't you, that our entire industry loses out every time another animal loving and compassionate groomer closes their doors out of not learning to better work alongside their pet clients' human counterparts?

And you do realize that forever in the balance between being truly right, or being truly wrong, there are hundreds of gradiations of compromise and simple differences in opinion...?

So, you as a person in this world, do you want to be part of the problem, or part of the solution?

Do you want to put out good things and feel at peace with your efforts each day, or do you want to allow yourself to fold on all of the differences you can help cultivate- effects that could ripple out and possibly change many more events than you can't currently foresee?

It is important every day to stop to realize how vast each small corner of our world actually is. And even that with all it is comprised of, it is still infinitely small when compared to the realization that each and every person has their own tiny place to fill, their own set of responsibilities, their own version of reality, and their own goodness to bring to this big world. And all of these things have to come into unison just to get then to walk through your salon door.

So what will you do to get them to keep coming back?

At times we walk a tightrope between skirting our best judgement and giving our paying customers what they want and are still able to pay for. Some say never compromise, but after all of these yers grooming, I have learned full well that cutting off your nose to spite your own face, can come at the expense of your business. Sure, we all want what's best for us because we're the ones doing the work, and should never put ourselves or our clients in harm's way. But over many issues we can take with any number of opportunitues in the given grooming day, we have to set our emotions aside and ask, "Is it really worth it"? Is it worth it to possibly ruin a client relationship over? Is it worth it to tarnish the level of respect and appreciation you work so hard every day to both earn and to deserve? Is it worth it to remove the opportunity to truly help the pet that sees you for the care they need to feel better? Who really gets let down in that equation? No one's ego, that's for sure. Furthermore, it can weigh heavily on your self respect for you to look back on a confrontation with a client and wish you'd done things differently. By then, the lesson learned and the reflection you make with have settled too late. 

Is it safe to be completely unforgiving in a profession where at any given moment, it could be you who needs the forgiveness and understanding? 

It is important to never compromise our ability to the point where we do something not in the dog's best interest nor with their comfort and safety at the helm. But it is also important not to sweat the small stuff. Not to let yourself get frustrated by what you see walk into your business each day, and not to judge minor infringements on prioritizing pet care to the top of everyone's list. To remember that unless a pet is truly being caused pain, there really is no definite assertion of cruelty. And if they are being put in harms way, you'll do them far more good by being an advocate for them than a tyrant.

What we as professionals notice, whose job it is to note all of the aspects of grooming and general health, often mistake as common knowledge the things we see being missed or not cared for, are simply not always apparent to a pet' owner. Mats here & there, dirty ears, overgrown nails, a lump or bump- and the owner never even knew it was there?! HOW?! you say, does an owner not know these things?!   Well, because not everyone is alike. Not everyone cares for a pet the same way, to the same level or way that you personally do, and no one in turn can be held to any one person's standard of judgement when we each must live our own lives each day. We all prioritize differently, we all find different things to be a soure of joy or a source of difficulty. And on any given day, our lives can change. Changes that ripple out and can drastically cause but brief interruptions in our normal schedules, and in our normal activities, or can permanently change the course that we had planned for ourselves. It is unfair as professional pet care providers to pass judgement on our clients. Yes, there is always a right and a wrong way to do any one thing, but isn't the perception of what is right and what is wrong as invidividually decided as the individual who sets their perceptions? What we perceive as neglect, may simply be something someone overlooked.

Do not immeidately attribute to malevolence what could as easily to attributed to ignorance.

It is not realistic to assume that we all hum along on the same set of algorythms and are all on the same page when it comes to how we take in or give back forms of love and relationships like those we as animal lovers find necessary towards happiness.

I personally find brushing my dogs to be a moment of zen. Both of bonding with them, and with accomplishing a task at the same time of finding sweet release in a repetitive behavior that is second nature to me. But in reality, by the time I've groomed everyone elses' dogs, some days I barely have the energy to eat a decent meal before falling into bed.

On those days, my dogs go unbrushed...

*GASP and clutch the pearls!*

It's true, and if anyone said I was a bad pet owner for having unbrushed dogs, or taking a #7 to my Poodle, because after all, I am a GROOMER, they'd likely recieve a stern reminder of an alternate reality and a parallel universe very quickly. ;)    

 The saying goes; "Be the change you want to see in the world".

Well, are you?

In the following series of articles, I will be writing about methods and mindsets for the salon that will help us overcome the shortcomings of pet owner upkeep and the lofty dreams of styling outcomes versus what we can do short of a magic wand.

Things that we can do to best help our pet clients, and best help our level of sanity, and to remain profitable, all the while being proactive towards staying happy and feeling accomplishment.  

Watchdog

Please stay tuned for many more blogs!


Session with Chris Sertzel on GroomerTALK LIVE!

Bio pic

Hello everyone!

Be sure to listen and call in for my LIVE session for PetGroomer.com's GroomerTALK!

This session will be on August 12th, 7PM EST.

Please call in with any questions you can come up with about things like skin and coat issues, offering supportive and spa type services, questions about competition grooming, or anything you can think of that might help you out! Its sure to be a fun and interesting broadcast!


Coconut Oil

Coconut2

The scientific name for coconut is Cocos nucifera.  Coconut is highly nutritious and rich in fiber, vitamins, and minerals. It is classified as a "functional food" because it provides many health benefits beyond its nutritional content. Coconut oil is of special interest because it possesses healing properties far beyond that of any other dietary oil and is extensively used in traditional medicine among Asian and Pacific populations. Pacific Islanders consider coconut oil to be the cure for all illness. The coconut palm is so highly valued by them as both a source of food and medicine that it is called "The Tree of Life." Only recently has modern medical science unlocked the secrets to coconut's amazing healing powers.  n traditional medicine around the world coconut is used to treat a wide variety of health problems including the following: abscesses, asthma, baldness, bronchitis, bruises, burns, colds, constipation, cough, dropsy, dysentery, earache, fever, flu, gingivitis, gonorrhea, irregular or painful menstruation, jaundice, kidney stones, lice, malnutrition, nausea, rash, scabies, scurvy, skin infections, sore throat, swelling, syphilis, toothache, tuberculosis, tumors, typhoid, ulcers, upset stomach, weakness, and wounds.  Published studies in medical journals show that coconut, in one form or another may provide a wide range of health benefits. Some of these are summarized below with regard to how they might help us to better care for skin and coat in our grooming salons: 

  • Kills viruses that cause influenza, herpes, measles, hepatitis C, SARS, AIDS, & other illnesses.
  • Kills fungi and yeasts that cause candidiasis, ringworm, athlete's foot, thrush, diaper rash, & other infections.
  • Expels or kills tapeworms, lice, giardia, & other parasites.
  • Reduces inflammation.
  • Supports tissue healing & repair.
  • Supports & aids immune system function.
  • Helps prevent periodontal disease & tooth decay.
  • Functions as a protective antioxidant.
  • Helps to protect the body from harmful free radicals that promote premature aging & degenerative disease.
  • Supports thyroid function.
  • Applied topically helps to form a chemical barrier on the skin to ward of infection.
  • Reduces symptoms associated the psoriasis, eczema, & dermatitis.
  • Supports the natural chemical balance of the skin.
  • Softens skin and helps relieve dryness & flaking.
  • Prevents wrinkles, sagging skin, & age spots.
  • Promotes healthy looking hair & complexion.
  • Coconut oil has both antibacterial & anti-microbial (contains: Lauric Acid & Capric Acid) agents within its structure.
  • Provides protection from damaging effects of ultraviolet radiation from the sun.
  • Helps control dandruff.
  • Has no harmful or discomforting side effects.
  • Is completely non-toxic to humans & pets.

 

Coconut oil has long been reveled concerning canines when it comes to nutrition and overall health and longevity. There are many, many benefits to including coconut oil in your own diet and as a source of better overall health. It is recommended to suggest adding coconut oil to a dog’s diet, and this can be further researched and suggested along with those reasons to your pet clients in the salon for better pet health overall.

While coconut possesses many health benefits due to its fiber and nutritional content, it's the oil that makes it a truly remarkable food and medicine.  Coconut oil is an edible oil extracted from the kernel or meat of matured coconuts harvested from the coconut palm.  Coconut oil is usually divided into two main kinds – refined (RBD) oil and virgin oil. RBD coconut oil is oil derived from copra (the dried-out coconut core) and is lower in quality than virgin oil.  In the contrary, virgin oil is simply unrefined oil. It is derived straight from the coconut nucleus. This form of coconut oil making is the most non artificial form and no synthetic filtering is used. 

What Coconut offers to the skin and hair?

Moisture Retaining Capacity: Coconut Oil has high moisture retaining capacity, since it is not broken down easily nor evaporated, being very stable. It does not let moisture escape thus keeping hair moistened and soft. This prevents breakage of hair. Coconut Oil is a far better conditioner for hair than any synthetic one available in the market.

Vitamin-E: Almost every aptly educated person knows the importance of vitamin-E for skin and hair. It keeps scalp and skin healthy and hair rejuvenated.

Lauric & Capric Acids: Provide anti-microbial action and seek to help normalize the skin.

Anti-Dandruff: The various fatty acids present in Coconut Oil serve as very good anti dandruff agents and are way better than any anti dandruff shampoo.  A regular application can help you get rid of dandruff forever.

Stimulates Hair Growth: By thinly and evenly coating the skin and hair shaft, this oil helps to seal in adequate moisture needed to optimize the healthy skin and follicle flora, and to protect the individual hair shaft as well.

Studies have shown that virgin coconut oil actually penetrates the hair shaft. It does this on both damaged and undamaged hair, both as a pre-wash and post-wash product. Because "Coconut oil, being a triglyceride of lauric acid (principal fatty acid), has a high affinity for hair proteins and, because of its low molecular weight and straight linear chain, is able to penetrate inside the hair shaft." Studies have also shown that using coconut oil on hair prevented combing damage.

Coconut oil has a very low melting point (the temperature at which a solid turns into a liquid. It is equal to the freezing point as well), lending it well to easily being added to a variety of shampoo mixes as well as various care methods for the skin which can be easily done by a pet groomer in the salon. 

Different uses depending on the mix and formulas

One should read labels on the products being research when buying. Some products made for hair care specifically will be parted with petrolatum in order to “stretch” the actual level of coconut oil within the product. The more pure coconut oil a product contains, the more it likely will cost and the better it is for you dietary and cosmetically.  This can usually be noticed first by the consistency of the oil within the tub or jar. The more pure coconut oil is, the more slightly solid or caked, and opaquely white in color it will be. While it will still easily scoop from the jar, it melts readily against the warmth of the hands and does not leave a sticky residue behind once rubbed in.  One can use oil parted with petrolatum, but it will likely require more dubious bathing to remove all extra product. One must use virgin coconut oil for the skin and hair, not the not the refined, bleached, and deodorized coconut oil that is usually sold in the cooking section of the supermarket.

 This is a photo of more desirable oil for both feeding and skin care.

How to apply it to dogs in the salon

This oil can be added to a shampoo of your choice, but it most easily, for dilution purposes due to the varying dilutions and formulations of shampoos, for beginners, be added as a simple step ahead of the bath.

  1. warm virgin coconut oil first if it is solid, by placing the bottle in a pot of warm water. If you don't want to heat the whole jar, take some out and put it in a safe container for use in the salon (BPH free plastic only if using plastic), then place that in warm to hot water. Do not use the microwave as that is not good for the oil- it causes breakdown of the beneficial ingredients.
  2. you can add some essential oils if you like, depending on your particular needs.
  3. apply enough so that the hair is completely covered-can be from head to tail, especially upon any areas which are symptomatic, but not so much that it is dripping.
  4. put pet in a warm towel- either wet or dry and allow developing for 7-10 minutes.
  5. Follow with a warm rinse thru of water to help wet the coat, and then apply a shampoo of your choice and finish bathing as usual. Condition the coat as needed.

It’s that simple! Three extra steps, and approximately 15 extra minutes to begin the healing and bring the terrific qualities of this oil to your salon and your clients!

For further study of this wonderful and versatile oil, visit any number of reputable online sites or read the book: Coconut Oil Benefits: Your Hair, Skincare, Weight loss, Aid To Digestion, Immune System, Fights Infections And Heart Disease Benefits [NOOK Book] by Dr. Doris Patton

 


A Homemade Holiday Gift Idea

This is off topic for grooming- but I wanted still to share it! This is an article by friend Rosalee de la Foret.

Make Your Own Lotion Bars for Holiday Gifts!

by Rosalee de la Forêt

Every year during the holiday season we pump out some extra HerbMentor newsletters to help you with creative herbal gift ideas, healthy and delicious food recipes and herbal medicine recipes. I’ve been thinking about these newsletters all year long and am excited to finally begin sharing them with you.

Our first newsletter is a really fun craft project. We’re giving it to you well in advance of the December holidays so you’ll have plenty of time to source the ingredients and make them yourself.

Every week I spend a couple of hours with my young friend Tova Rose. We explore the plant world together, making herbal remedies, reading stories and playing games.

Tova recently turned 10 and I wanted to give her something special for her birthday. I’d already given her every book I could find for kids involving herbs, including many coloring books. We’d already made salves and syrups.... what to do?

Finally, with the brainstorming of friends I was given a great idea. A lotion bar kit!

Lotion bars are firm bars that can be rubbed onto the skin like lotion. They are great for dry cracked skin (like the knuckles or heels). A friend told me she specifically uses them to moisturize her cuticles and fingernail beds.

Making lotion bars is fairly easy too, a lot like salves in fact, and just involves different proportions of wax to oil. I’ve since made a handful of batches and each time I’ve used slightly different ingredients. Here’s my favorite mix so far.

The lotion bars themselves are great gifts and even the giving of a lotion bar kit makes a wonderful holiday present as well.

The following recipe makes about seven one-ounce bars

To make this recipe you’ll need...

  • 3 ounces of beeswax
  • 1.5 ounces of cocoa butter
  • 1.5 ounces of shea butter
  • 3 ounces of an herbal infused oil
  • mold or tin
  • saucepan reserved for salve making
  • something to stir with (I use jumbo popsicle sticks)
  • essential oils (optional)
  • GET YOUR SUPPLIES right here at Mountain Rose Herbs

Measure out the wax and butters by weight. Begin by melting the beeswax, cocoa butter and shea butter. I use a pan exclusively for salve making for this (I got it at the thrift store for $2!). You want to heat this on as low heat as possible. Some people even use a double boiler. Stir frequently to avoid burning the wax and butters.


Once the wax and butters are melted you are going to add the oil. This is measured by volume and can be any cosmetic oil. I personally like jojoba or grape seed oil. Both of these oils are “dry” oils, meaning they absorb into the skin readily. Rose hip seed oils is also lovely. Olive oil can be used but it will have a more oily feeling to it.


To make this extra special you can infuse the oil with herbs. I chose calendula for mine. If you’ve never infused an oil before you can learn how in the Herbal Basics course on HerbMentor.com. You can also use an oil that hasn’t been infused with herbs.

When the oil is added to the melted materials the wax and butters may harden a bit.


Keep stirring with the heat on low until the mixture is completely melted. Oils will go rancid more quickly when exposed to too much heat, so limit the amount of heat on the actual oils as much as possible.

When everything is melted you can add your optional essential oils.

Lastly, pour the mixture into molds or tin containers.


Not sure whether to use a mold or a container?

The plus side of molds is that you can buy these silicon molds in a variety of different shapes and sizes. Once the lotion bars have cooled it’s really easy to remove them from the mold. You could also try using muffin baking sheet (warning, I haven’t done this). I would grease the tins with coconut oil before pour the mixture into the baking sheet.

The tins offer more protection to the bar and could be carried in purses etc. If using tins make sure they have a flat side so that when the lotion bar solidifies it can easily slip out. If there is a curled lip at the rim you’ll have a hard time getting it out! If you live in a hot environment I strongly suggest using a tin for lotion bars.

When these are completely cooled you can pop them out of the mold or tin and put them to use.

Keep these in a cool place. If they get too hot they will melt again. If you are giving them as a gift - be sure to tell the recipient to keep them in a cool place.


These make great gifts! In the picture below I’ve wrapped the lotion bar in a cello bag (along with all the ingredients). (Available at Mountain Rose Herbs).


Enjoy!

~Rosalee


2011 Annual WAPPS Pet Stylist Invitational

 

Camera April 20 030

Its that time of year again!

Our 6th annual Pet Stylist Invitational will be held this year on October 9th! 

This year's venue has graciously been offered to be held at the Central Bark in Madison, WI.

The day will begin for competitors at 9am for prejudging, and for show attendees not competing in the grooming competition, the doors will open at 10am.

The day's events and lineup are as follows, however, minor last minute changes may take place:

 

8am   Competitors arriving

9am    Prejudging for Competition starts

10am  Invitational opens for all attendees

10am  Two-tiered Potpourri Grooming Competition begins

12pm  Grooming Competition Ends & Judging begins

1pm    Awards & Placement announcements & Competition photos taken

1pm    Catered full lunch served

2pm    Hands on critiques of competition dogs in open forum discussion

3pm    Breeder/Handler hosted breed class: Schnauzers- Miniature/Standard/Giant

4pm    Clipper Vac Salon Demo

6pm    Raffle winners announced

7pm    WCMCS Written Master exam session ends

8pm    Invitational Ends


 

 

                                      **All day**

                          Groomer's Tool Swap & Sale

                               ExcelaGroom  booth

                                    UltraLift Booth

                               Element Shears for sale

       Hundreds of DVDs and Books at hand for leisure viewing

               Free samples and giveaways for all attendees

                On site membership registration & renewal

                 On site WCMCS Master Written Exam class

                    

                              
                                  We've come a long way!


Download Fair Enrollment fee schedule

Download Groom Fair Sign up

Download Competitor Groomer sign up

Attendee insurance waiver

 

For attendees traveling & needing hotel accomodations, email me for the contact for a pet friendly hotel offering WAPPS member discounted rates!