How To Prevent Cord Problems on Clippers With Voltage Converters

Some groomers have been experiencing cord problems with clippers having voltage converters on the end of the cord. These converters convert 120 volts AC to DC current that runs your clipper. DC motors have more torque and seem to hold speed better in tough coat. Because of the extra weight of some of these cords, they break and short out right behind the clipper. If the converter is pulled from the wall socket and hits the floor, components inside can break and cause the cord to fail as well. You can prevent these situations from happening with a few modifications you can do yourself.

The Cord

The cord can short where the thick part goes into the clipper. This thick part of the cord is called the “Stress Relief”. It is suppose to be stiff and make the cord do the bending out past the stress relief where the cord is thinner. But with the twisting and turning groomers do these days, that can cause this cord to start shorting right behind the clipper. I have found by using a “zip-tie”, and zip-tying the cord to the hanger in the back, it keeps the cord from twisting behind the clipper. Doing this makes the cord twist and bend out where the cord is smaller, and that’s what it was designed to do. Look at the example in the picture, and zip-tie your cord the same way. If you need the hanger to hang your clipper, get a key ring and run it through the hanger and hang your clipper from it.

IMG_20141014_113714_826

 

The Converter

Another issue with this cord, and any other clipper having a voltage converter on the end where you plug it in, is the cord becoming “Dead”. These converters, even though they are small, are packed with components. If you accidently pull this converter out of the wall and it hits the floor, the chances of one of these components breaking is great, thus the cord will become dead, and no electricity will go to the clipper. Below is a picture of the inside of the voltage converter.

IMG_20140921_111557_623

 

As you can see, there is quite a bit of electronics packed into this small box, and it doesn’t take that big of a whack to break something inside if its pulled from the wall socket and it hits the leg on your grooming table. The solution? Get a power strip, and set it on the floor, then plug your cord with the converter into the power strip. It can’t fall from the floor, and you just saved yourself the expense of a new cord and sending it off for repairs.
In conclusion, if you zip-tie your cord now before it starts to short out, and get a power strip to plug it into and set it on the floor, I think your problems will be over.


As always, read all your labels and manuals, and have a safe day grooming!

Jeff


Scissor Care That Every Groomer Can Do

When you get new shears, or shears back from the sharpener, they are adjusted to cut. We at Northern Tails service Pet Groomers only, and we adjust shears they way we want them to cut focusing on the tips and the front end of the shear.

The adjustment for tension (or balance as some call it), is a screw or thumb wheel on the pivot of the shears. Beveled edge shears are adjusted to where the blades grab about ¾ an inch from the tip. This enables the blades to slice from the pivot all the way to the tips. If tension isn’t set like this on beveled 10” shears, the blades may push apart from one another in thicker coat and fold at the tips. There is a space between the blades of beveled shears that has to be there, this gives this shear the “slicing” action it needs to get through tough coat with ease. This type of edge is the workhorse of the grooming industry and can be used on any type of coat. This edge lasts for months unless you drop them or hit something in the coat and create a nick.

Convex shears have a different edge all together. This edge is a razor, and is also sharpened differently. Convex edges are honed on both sides, first on the diamond wheel to create the edge, then honed on the interior of the blade to make that edge a razor. Convex shears have little or no space between the blades because they are so sharp they “chop” through hair rather than slicing to produce a beautiful cut used in finish work. Tension is adjusted to where the blades start to grab 1/3 to ½ way down from the tips keeping the blades as close as possible to each other. If the tension is too loose on a convex shear two things can happen: the blades may grab ¾ of an inch from the pivot creating a gouge, and they can fold hair at the tips.

Note: The tension adjustment is for adjusting the way the shear cuts, its not for the convenience or ease of the way the shear opens and closes. Tension can be adjusted a little, but if its adjusted so the shear feels loose to you because of hand or scissoring problems, thats not good because they may fold at the tips. There are shears available with ball bearings in the pivot. This type of shear feels loose no matter what the tension is adjusted at.

CLEANING YOUR SHEARS

Cleaning shears

Clean your shears daily. Wipe all the hair from the inside of the blades, this attracts moisture which can rust your shears. If the blades have grime or hairspray on them, take a Handy Wipe and rub all this off. Never leave shears dirty because it will cause problems down the road.

LUBRICATION

Lubing shears

Lubricate shears with shear lube only, it contains silicon and a light solvent. Not lubricating can cause the screw to rust and not stay tight. There is moisture in your pivot from scissoring, lube gets rid of it. Not lubing can cause tiny pieces of hair and pet dander to remain in the pivot. This will tighten the tension, slow the shear down, and may cause a binding feel when scissoring. Lube the shear, then open and close them a few times to get the lube around the pivot good. Convex shears need to be lubed more than beveled shears. Never use blade oil on a shear, it will stiffen over time. Most beauty supply stores carry shear/scissor lube.

Have a great day grooming, and read those labels.

Jeff


Spring Check-up For Your Equipment and Shop

Everyone is slow this time of year, and its a good time to go through your grooming equipment and shop equipment. This is the calm before the storm, the snowbirds are coming back and usually their pets are a mess, so our equipment has to be ready.

  • Blades – Even though your blades are cutting now, they may give out later. If you can afford it, get all your 7’s and 10’s sharpened now. Go through your drawers in the shop and look for blades you may have thrown in them for some reason or another, if they are still good get them sharpened. Start oiling them and washing them in blade wash to keep them cutting longer.
  • Clippers – Check every clipper you have for broken cords, worn hinges, and change the blade drive. Check all the screws to make sure they are tight. Now is the time to get them serviced so they don’t quit during shavedown. And don’t try to groom having  only one clipper, you need a backup. The money you loose because you can’t work may buy several clippers.
  • Shears – Same thing. If you can afford it, get them sharpened now. If you start a process of wiping them down and lubing them every night the edge will last longer. Scissor lube is very important, it lubes the pivot of your shears, and it also protects the screw so it doesnt start rusting and loosening up all the time. Shears will rust if you don’t wipe them down. You can get scissor lube from any grooming catalogue, or any beauty supply store.
  • Dryers – Some  groomers dont know how to maintain dryers properly. Dryers need to be cleaned out weekly and sometimes daily. Take the filters out and clean them by blowing them out with a second dryer, or washing the filter in warm soapy water and let dry overnight.  Another thing you can do to prevent the fusable link on the switch is to blow the dryer out. If its a canister dryer, you can take the front and back off and blow the hair out with a second dryer or an air hose. When too much hair accumulates on the inside of a dryer, the motors overheat and blow the fuse on the switch. Happened to me many times before I got smart and started to clean them out. Carbons should be changed yearly. I change them every spring whether they need it or not. Its simple to do if you follow the directions in your manual.
  • Bathing Room – This is usually a mess when I start on it. First I gather up all the nooses and get rid of the broken ones. Next, I go through the towels and toss the ones with holes or are all frayed up. We got our towels used from hospitals, yard sales, GoodWill, and flea markets.  Soaps and mixing bottles are next. I get rid of bad mixing bottles that lost their marks, and I combine soaps of the same kind so I can order new supplies. Check the tubs for leaks, and make sure the hair filters are good and still able to catch the hair. If your using fiberglass tub inserts for a bathing tub, check the bottom of the tub with your fingers and feel for holes caused by nail scratches. You can pick up fiberglass patches from a home improvement store. Fix them while they’re small or you’ll be replacing the tub.
  • Drawers & Cabinets – If you have any drawers or cabinets in your shop go through everyone and throw out stuff thats broken or unusable. If you have a box of clippers your saving for parts, remember that if they sit around in that humid environment for a year or two they may not run anymore. Moisture will ruin the armature, but cords and body parts should be OK.
  • Card Files – Most of us have regular customers that come routinely, so a large card file may be OK. If you have a big shop with multiple groomers you may want to go through the card file and see if the cards are current. If they haven’t been back in two or more years you may want to move that card out of your active files. We did that one year and got rid of 300 cards, some haven’t been back in over 5 years. A card file does need cleaned up once in a while. You can also make cold calls on the cards that are non- active and try to get their business back.
  • Mobile Groomers – You basically have the same chores to do but at a smaller scale. Vehicle maintenance, and generator maintenance are the big concerns for you. Time now to get everything checked before you get real busy.

I just wanted to get everyone aware of some things you can do to get you and your shop ready for spring and summer. You can use this list again after the kids go back to school this fall to get ready for the Christmas rush. Being proactive with your equipment and shop could prevent surprizes and untimely bills.

Hope this can help somebody. Be safe, and remember to read those labels.

Jeff

 


Mobile Sharpeners: Can Their Sharpening Equipment Get Out Of Calibration Because They Are Mobile?

Yes it can, the calibration does get off when doing mobile sharpening.  I did mobile sharpening in 5 states down here in the south before I went strictly mail-in for 15 years. Even though your equipment is solid in your van or trailer, going over bumps, hitting pot holes,  and going over railroad tracks does vibrate the calibration off. I would check my calibration weekly on my automated blade machine,  and the arm position on my scissor sharpening machines. Most times they were still dead on, sometimes they were off just a couple thousands, but that little variation can cause a scissor to fold at the tips, and blades to fail the rub test (explained later on).

In my sharpening shop, the scissor machines never move, but when I roll my two automated blade machines around to clean or when I change the sharpening plate, I check the calibration of the automated arms. Once in a while I have to adjust, but its nothing like when I was on the road bouncing around all the time. Bad calibration can really shorten the life of the cutting surface of the blade because the hollow ground of the blade isn't centered correctly.

I've taught several sharpeners who purchased the same equipment I use the importance of getting the blade centered on the hollow grind of the plate, and not assume the factory marks on the automated arms were correct. And also to check the calibration weekly of their automated machine. Bumpy roads can be certain death to an automated blade machine, but taking the time to check calibration will prevent alot of very angry customers when the blades start to have issues.

Whats “Hollow Ground” on a blade?

Blades dont have flat surfaces like it seems when you look at them. The cutting surfaces are "Pitched" a few thousands so the tips of the cutter teeth, and the very rear of cutter touch the blade underneath it. This enables the blade teeth to cut like a tiny pair of scissors as the teeth go back and forth across each other. If they were flat, they would snag in the first inch of hair you tried to cut with them. Sharpening plates aren't flat either, they are pitched as well to grind this "hollow ground" as we call it to make the blade work. When the blade is put on the plate to be sharpened, the very center of the blade must be in the center of this pitch. If its past the center, or short of the center, cutting life is shortened.This is where calibration is so important.

 Hollow ground is checked by rubbing a freshly sharpened cutter blade on a flat steel plate (test plate), sharpeners  call this "rubbing the blade out". After you rub it on the plate and turn it over you can see a small shinny area across the very tips of all the teeth, and areas on both sides of the back rail, this shows pretty good hollow ground. If the entire tooth is shinny , its out of calibration too far. If the teeth are shinny on each side but not in the middle of the blade, the calibration is too short. Sharpeners who use a manual sharpening machine (one without automated arms),  have no calibration to check. Creating a good hollow ground depends on holding the blade in their hand with a magnet, and going back and forth across the plate trying to keep the blade as straight as they can. With a manual machine, every blade is sharpened differently, and the variation can be enormous.


Here is a question to ask the sharpener your currently using : "When was the last time you checked the calibration of your equipment"? or "Do you rub blades out to check the hollow ground"? If you get a "NO" for either of these questions, that sharpener has no idea what kind of work they are putting out. The blades may cut good now, but for how long? Another reason to rub blades out is to check if the machine is indeed grinding a hollow ground blade. Sharpening too many blades on a sharpening plate will decrease the hollow ground capability of it, and the blades will be sharpened flat and will not work long  if they work at all. If a sharpener rubs out blades religiously, and sees the shinny area on the tips of the cutter teeth start to come down the tooth, its a signal to change that sharpening plate.

I know this was kinda long, but Im hoping to have some sharpeners as part of my audience, as well as interested groomers. It may actually let a few sharpeners re-evaluate what they are doing to insure they are putting out good work for their customers. Those that are doing this already know what Im talking about and will agree "Its better for YOU to catch a potential problem, and not let your customer catch it for you". Calibration is an important part of the sharpening process, and the customer perspective of our work is something we never want to get tarnished.

Now everyone knows more than me about all this, and its good to know as a groomer what it takes to ensure your blades are sharpened correctly. Knowledge is power!

Have a great day grooming, and read those labels.


What is Clipp-Aid? A Great New Product For Groomers.

Groomers all over the world are asking questions about the new product Clipp-Aid?  Does Clipp-Aid bring dull blades back to life?  Is it harmless when exposed to humans and pets?  With all the chemicals groomers use, is Clipp-Aid safe to use in my salon?  The answer to all these questions is “Yes”.  In this article, I’ll share with you the breadth and thoroughness of my testing of Clipp-Aid over the last few months.  My conclusion is that Clipp-Aid really is a fabulous new product for groomers!

Several months ago, there was a flurry of comments about Clipp-Aid on Facebook and groomer forums.  In response, Clipp-Aid contacted me to try out their product in my shop to get a groomers perspective on the product.  As an Organic Chemist, Blade Sharpener, and Pet Groomer for over 30 years, I was astounded by the results this small bag of crystals did at sharpening a blade well enough that I could continue grooming more dogs after using Clipp-Aid on my dull blades.  It is something groomers need in their kit in case of emergencies.

Clipp-Aid is intended to bring a dull blade back to life again and can be used repeatedly as needed.  Yet, at some point, I would suggest getting your blades professionally sharpened and adjusted by your local sharpener since using Clipp-Aid is not a substitute for professional sharpening.

One thing I noticed when I got the product is the instructions say to "Place the cutting point of the blade into the crystals" then "Move the blade through the crystals for 45 to 60 seconds".  This tells me that you may not be using the product correctly, and you could get discouraged at the results.  Don’t be discouraged!  Clipp-Aid is now aware of this and have revised the instructions that now accompany the sale of its products.  I fold the bag to make sure the depth of the crystals is sufficient to cover the cutter teeth during the sharpening process.

Clippaid1  FOLDED    Clippaid2   CUT OPEN

First off, you have to have the correct bag for the size blade you are going to sharpen.  Thirty years ago, groomers used salt to get by with their dull blades.  At that time, you had to push the blade into the salt (covering the cutter teeth) and let it sharpen until its looks like the salt is pulverized, then pick it out and push it into another part of the salt.  The problem was that it took the whole container of salt to sharpen one blade.  This was because as soon as you put the blade into the salt, the salt instantly pulverized.  This resulted is a slight sharpen before large amounts of salt became useless. That's why we had to keep putting it in, and taking it out to get an edge back on the blade so we could do only a few more dogs.  This was very tedious and far less effective as using Clipp-Aid. 

I believe that Clipp-Aid is a form of concrete that has been crushed and sifted down to the correct size needed to sharpen dull blades.  With Clipp-Aid, you do push the blade into the crystals (covering the cutter teeth), yet the crystals are designed not to pulverize so fast in contrast to salt.  As a result, the dull blades are brought back to life in about one to two minutes with a small amount of Clipp-Aid crystals.  For me, I was able to sharpen two blades twice using a single bag of Clipp-Aid.

Clipp-Aid is 100% safe to use in your salons.  It is an inert compound that doesn't react with anything.  I mixed it with every liquid in my shop looking for a reaction and got nothing. I even put it on a bad scrape that bled when a dog scratched me, and it didn't even burn like many medical products would. It was nice to see the product was completely safe and non-reactive.

Anyway, that's Clipp-Aid in a nutshell. It is very important to use this product correctly in order to get the best results.  Getting the cutter deep enough in the crystals, and bringing it in and out of the crystals is the key to using it properly.  Also, it is a good idea to have a dog standing by so that you can test the sharpness of your blade while using Clipp-Aid.  Check out the 4 simple steps below that I would recommend to every groomer using Clipp-Aid.

Have a great day grooming, and read those labels. 

 

Jeff’s Instructions For Using Clipp-Aid

  1. Get a dog to test your sharpness on. Its best to do it with a dog present so you can test for sharpness as you are running your blade in the crystals. If it isn't sharp on the first try, you run it again in the crystals and try it on the dog again.
  2. Get the bag and tip it on its side and get all the crystals to one side of the bag. You need the "depth" of the crystals. Now fold the bag in half, turn it right side up, and cut the top open.
  3. Get your clipper with the blade on it. Open the top of the package, and slide the folded part of the bag so the opening is large enough to get your blade into it. Hold the bag with one hand, and your clipper in the other.
  4. Make sure your blade is clean of hair or oil. Turn the clipper ON and stick the blade into the crystals making sure the cutter teeth are below the surface of the crystals. Hold it there 5 seconds, pull it out of the crystals slightly and stick it back in. Do this 5 times. (5 seconds - 5 times ). You should see the crystals turning lighter in color. You can slightly shake the bag to mix up the crystals getting more good stuff to the surface.

Conversion between Pet Grooming and Beauty/Barber blades

Have you ever had a blade dull out and you didn’t have another in the same size available? The sharpening hasn’t came back yet and purchasing a blade from a catalogue takes too much time. You start reverse cuts with other blades to accomplish the same cut, and it works but its still not the same as the right blade. There is help available in a place you would never think of and it may be only a ten minute drive from your shop....The Beauty/Barber supply store. The blades at the beauty supply store are actually the same blade your using except they have a different numbering system to their blades. They fit all the pet grooming clippers as well.

Pet Grooming Size             Barber/Beauty Size

#10                                            #0

#15                                           #0A

#30                                           #000 (Cuts like a 40)

#40                                           #0000 (Cuts like a 50)

#50                                          #00000 (For Bald Heads)

#9                                            #1A

#8 ½                                        #1

#7F                                          #1 ½

#5F                                          #2

#4F                                         #3 ½

There are no “Skip-tooth” blades with the Barber/Beauty blades, and your steel guard combs may not fit, but they should. Try them on first at the store to make sure. Their blades look just like ours except the numbers are different on the back. The barber/beauty blades have saved the groomers in our shop alot of frustration during shave down season.

Read Those Labels, anf have a great day grooming

Jeff


Spamming My Blog or Any Other Blog

One thing I won't tolerate is posting a comment that doesn't pertain to any blog, or your doing it to advertise your business in some way.

These blogs are important to groomers all over the world who seek advice on the topics we are trying to cover. If your comment is unrelated, spam, or written in a language other than English (if you can read English you can write English), it will be reported as spam and deleted.

I hope other bloggers will do the same, and keep this forum clean for the folks who appreciate it.

Read those labels, and have a great day grooming!!

Jeff


WHAT DAMAGE CAN HAPPEN WHEN YOU DROP YOUR CLIPPER

We all hold our breath when we drop a clipper because we hope it still runs when we pick it off the floor. Our clipper is the most important tool we have as a groomer, so we have to do our monthly maintenance, clean the hair from it, and make sure it doesn’t hit the floor.

All clippers have the same problems when they are dropped, but we will look at the Andis AGC Ultra Edge because its the most common clipper among most groomers.

THE SWITCH

When the clipper hits the floor, it jars the insides very much. The switch has a capacitor on it that can bust loose from the curcuit board. It has two small wires that are only soldered to the board, and when the clipper hits the floor they can break.

AGC Switch_capacitor

If just one of these wires is broken, you will loose your high speed. The switch is screwed into the rear motor mounts of the clipper. The motor mounts are just two plastic posts located on the bottom clipper body that holds the rear of your motor. If either of these mounts break off when the clipper is dropped, it can cause your clipper to get hot when running. The motor vibrates because nothing is holding it at the back thus causing the heat. This ever happen to you? Lower clipper bodies are about $10.00

THE MOTOR FIELD

This is a big thing that can short out your armature, blow your switch, and possibly cause smoke to come from the clipper. Figure about $90 to fix this if the damage is this extensive.

The motor field is a round steel tube lined with two curved magnets, your armature spins inside this tube. When your clipper is turned on, your brushes cause a negative polarity to the magnets and this causes the armature to spin, which moves your blade drive back and forth making the blade cut.

Broken magnet

If you drop your clipper, and it hits hard enough, you can crack these magnets. They can fragment causing shorts which can blow the armature and switch. Also, if one the the fragments is small enough, it can lodge against the aramture inside and pin it so it doesnt move. Usually when this happens you can hear the clipper “hum” when you turn it on, but it wont run. If you experience this, don’t try to use it anymore and send it in for repair. A new motor field can cost about $25.00, armatures are about $40.00, switches are about $15.00, plus the labor charge.

Since your clipper is so important to your working or not, you need to take care of it. I learned by experience a long time ago that setting a clipper under a dog on the table can really ruin your day. I use a small table next to my grooming table, and I set shears and clippers on it when not using them. It may be a lifestyle change for you to start doing that as well if your having your equipment kicked off the table on a regular basis.

Read those labels, and have fun grooming!

jEFF


The Three Daily Goals Of A Pet Groomer

To be successful in this business doesn’t depend on your knowledge of grooming or the equipment you use, it actually depends on some very basic goals you accomplish every day. My grooming instructor over 30 years ago covered these goals with us and I think about them from time to time in my own shop. They are simple goals such as “Make Money”, “Customer Perspective”, and “Safety”. Three little goals that pass through our minds everyday, but we never really think about how much they impact every day we work.

Make Money

We all know making money is what we get into this business for in the first place, but how we make money is important. You make money several different ways like “Saving Money”, trying to get the best deals on products you use like soaps, conditioners, the products your shop runs on every day. Careing for your equipment, doing some of the repair work yourself as opposed to paying a sharpener to fix stuff for you. Compulsive spending is the biggest thing you have to watch. Do you really need that pair of shears everyone is talking about? If you can curb compulsive spending you will see a huge increase in your net income. Watching your utilities like electricity, are you running dryers longer than needed? Air conditioning set too low? The little things add up at the end of the month. We all charge a fair price for our grooms for the areas we work in, but being frugal in our spending, our payroll, and our operating costs can make us additional money by actually saving it.

Customer Perspective

This is the most important of the three goals, this can actually make or break you in this business. Customer perspective has three parts in it as well, your customer has to have a good perspective of “Your Work”, Your Shop”, and most importantly “YOU”. You can be the best groomer in the world and not be successful. Customer perspective of your work doesn’t include how perfect the groom is, but does mean “Did you do what the customer asked for?”. Sometimes you have to leave your idea of how a groom should be to the side and “Do exactly what the customer wants you to do”. Making your customer happy is the goal, even if the groom looks stupid to you, it made your customer happy and they will be back. Customer perspective of your shop is important also because they are leaving their “child” with you. Is your shop clean, uncluttered, can a customer sense danger in your shop? Does your shop smell clean or can you smell the cages in the parking lot? A good shop can bring customers back just for that reason alone regardless of the groom. Finally, your customers perspective of YOU. Do you treat the pets nice and not yell at them all the time. Pets sense this and sometimes act like they don’t want to come into your shop. Are you a pleasant natured person, or do you let things get to you all the time? Do you carry an attitude all day if something happened or something is bothering you? If a customer senses animosity in any form to them or their pet, they may take it personally and never come back. A good example of displaying animosity in the shop is when a customer comes early for a pickup and the pet isn’t done yet. Its very easy to make that person feel bad for coming early and you don’t even know your doing it. One time can change that customers perspective of you forever. So try to be happy if you can, it can be profitable for you.

Safety

When we think of safety, we think since no one got bit, and no pet got hurt, its good. Thats not all, we have to go further and think of other things like controlling “unsafe acts” and “near misses”. A grooming shop is a haven for near misses and unsafe acts because its the most aggressive form of hair care in the world. Our clientel just doesn’t come in and sit down, we have to fight them sometimes to get them in the tub and washed. If you really think about it, there are things you do every day that can actually injure you with no real fault of your own. Near misses are accidents that almost happened but didn’t, and most of these can be prevented from turning into a real accident that could injure you. A good one that comes to mind is when your getting a wet dog out of the tub and your feet slip alittle while your getting it over to the drying table. You didn’t slip and fall with the dog and hurt either of you, but the potential was there for some serious injury. To prevent the near miss in this situation would be to have the floor dry, or put some sort of non-slip media on the floor to prevent slipping. Just think about the near misses you’ve had in your shop and what you can do to prevent them. An unsafe act is something you do that you know you shouldn’t, but you do it anyway for some reason. We have all done stupid things that we shouldn’t have done and got away with it. But remember this, Mr Murphy (Murphys Law) walks back and forth in front of our grooming shop everyday, we don’t want him knocking on the door. Please, don’t be unsafe by cutting corners, not following directions, and worse yet doing something completely stupid, its not worth it in the long run. You are in control of 90% of what happens in the shop, so use that control to be safe, and you and your clients will go home every night un-injured.

Now that you've read these goals, think how or if they can apply to you and your business. They can help.

Be safe, read those labels, and have a great day grooming!

Jeff


New diamond carbide nail grinding wheel makes cardboard wheels obsolete.

Wheels 2

Introducing the last nail grinding wheel you will buy for a while.

 This is a diamond impregnated carbide wheel that replaces the paper wheels your putting on your Dremmel to grind nails. It fits on the mandrel your currently using on your Dremmel, and they don’t break apart. This wheel is washable, and you can grind nails right in the tub to keep the dust down when the nails are softer. You can use it on dogs, cats, horses, any reptile, and even birds. One unique thing about this wheel is, if the nail has rough edges after clipping, this wheel wont splinter the nail like the paper wheels do sometimes. It leaves a very smooth finish without the vibration the paper wheels are known to do that scares the animal. There is no sand to come off in your face, and they won't bust apart on big dog nails. This is the perfect wheel if your grinding cat nails. When the paws are went or covered with snow, thats not a problem. This wheel will grind nails with the pads wet or dry because water actually helps the grinding. Since they are metal, they can get warm doing big dogs. To cool, just turn the Dremmel off and stick the wheel right in a glass of water, try that with paper wheels.

Its not as expensive as you might think when you compare the wheels you use now and the time they break apart when your doing a nail. This wheel has been going over a year in our shop, and we clean it regularly. Just hold the wheel under a small stream of water in the sink and scrub with a toothbrush.

I've sold hundreds of these wheels on Facebook, my website, and while sharpening my customers all along the Gulf Coast. No one will ever use a paper wheel again, this product is that good! You can buy these wheels in a couple places. The Barter Page (pet grooming) on Facebook, my sales website, and several mobile sharpeners have them as well

The going price for this wheel is $20, and that includes the mandrel. Its always good to have an extra mandrel, I've bent a few from having the Dremmel kicked out of my hand. If you add up all the wheels you use in a year you would be shocked, close to $100 in most cases. And when your out of them, they are hard to find because other groomers in the area are looking for them as well. You can have a wheel that won't wear out, bust apart, or throw sand in your eyes anymore.

For information, you can go to my product sales website       www.ntforsale.biz

Have a great day grooming, and most of all, read those labels and product manuals.

Jeff