Previous month:
January 2011
Next month:
March 2011

February 2011

Why Should A Pet Professional Take A Pet First Aid Class?


Because the truth is accidents can and do happen. None of us schedule 2pm: Trip and fall over dryer hose. As professionals we owe it to the pets in our care to be prepared for the unplanned.

Be Aware. The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) says that 60% of all veterinary visits are emergency in nature. They go on to state that 25% more pets could have been saved if only one pet first aid technique was applied before veterinary treatment. A study done in the American Veterinary Journal states that only 10% of pets needing CPR would survive if CPR is not done before arrival at the veterinarian. Another study by the AAHA shows preventable accidents as the leading cause of death and disability among pre-senior pets.

Be Knowledgeable. What are some of the safety issues that relate directly to groomers?

• Sudden blunt force trauma happens if a pet falls off a grooming table. Or you trip over exposed cords. Or you can slip on a wet floor while carrying a pet. Take advantage of the Golden Hour. It takes approximately one hour for adrenaline to dissipate from the body after an injury. Symptoms are not felt until the adrenaline is gone. Once symptoms present, itʼs generally too late. Look to Natasha Richardson as an example of someone who wasted her Golden Hour. She was the actress who died after hitting her head in a ski accident. She refused on site medical treatment. When symptoms presented later, it was too late.

• Neck injuries or strangulation when an unattended pet or even when an attended cat jumps off a table while noosed.

• Hypothermia caused by prolonged exposure to cool temperature. It can happen when placing a wet pet under a cool air dryer. You only need to lower the petʼs temperature by four degrees.

• Dehydration as a result of no water provided to the pet. Stress can also cause dehydration. It can lead to organ failure or death in a very short time.

• Burns resulting from overexposure to hot blades or hot air dryers. So will chewing on electrical cords. Using equipment without Ground Fault Interruptors (GFI) outlets around the tub can result in electrocution burns. Thermal burns can occur when a hot air dryer heats a metal cage.

• Heatstroke from being left too long with a hot air dryer. Enclosed kennel dryers are notorious for this. The young, old, immune-suppressed and brachycephalic dogs and any cat are particularly susceptible. Brachycephalic dogs have the pushed in faces. Examples are Shih Tzuʼs and Pugs.

• Bleeding injures and wounds caused by scissors and clippers. In addition, hematomas and sebaceous cysts may erupt while in your care.

• Heart failure caused by stress, chewing on electrical cords, electrocution as well as preexisting medical conditions. Cat groomers should monitor the cats stress level closely. They are prone to stress induced heart failure.

• A seizure brought on by poisoning, stress, HV dryer and preexisting medical conditions. Poisoning occurs when a pet ingests, inhales or otherwise absorbs improperly stored cleaning and pesticide products. Older dogs are more susceptible to a seizure brought on by the HV dryer.

• Injuries caused by kennel or tub grates.

• Any pet can have an allergic reaction to any product we use.

• Choking on an inappropriate sized treat or toy and any treat given to a dog that gulps his food.

• The HV dryer can blow out an eardrum or cause an anal prolapse when used improperly.

Be Proactive. Most of the above are preventable accidents. Wrap up cords and hoses when not in use. Make sure there is a clear path from one area to the next. Keep the bathing area floors dry. Store toxic materials in a closed cabinet. Monitor pets at all times. Exercise caution when using your equipment. Do you have the phone numbers handy to your local vet and the after hours office? Do you know how to get to the after hours office? You donʼt want to try and find it in a panic. Walk through your shop and note possible problems and correct them. Go home and do the same. Your four legged furry family members will appreciate it.

Be Prepared. Take a pet first aid class. Written materials and videos alone are not a pet first aid class. To properly learn these skills, your Instructor must be properly trained. Be choosy. Ask questions. What did their training consist of? Pet first aid and CPR is best learned through a combination of lecture, demonstration and hands on skills. A professional level class should include the following: bleeding and shock, restraining and muzzling, primary pet assessment,rescue breathing, CPR, fracture and limb injuries, insect bites and stings, snakebite, seizures, first aid kits and emergency preparedness kits, poisoning and poisonous substances, choking and snout to tail assessments. A better class will also advocate a healthy pet lifestyle. This includes the importance of dental care. Furthermore, it should also stress the importance of both when to seek veterinary care and of establishing a relationship with your vet.

Be Proud. Hang that certificate for all your clients to see. Knowing these skills is the difference between life or death, between temporary or permanent disability and between a short recovery or a long recuperation. These skills will also give you the confidence needed when an emergency arises. Your clients will know you care.

Be Responsible. Iʼve had three occasions with my own pets that required pet first aid. All three situations ended up being very minor when they could have easily escalated into a far more serious situation. Have release forms that allow you to perform pet first aid and CPR on the pets in your care.

Taking a pet first aid class is the right thing to do. We are responsible for the pets in our care and in our lives. They would do the same for us.

 

 


Four hour Pet CPR and First Aid Class at HHBacker in Atlantic City, NJ.

On Wednesday, April 13th from 9:30 to 2:30 we will be presenting the 4 hour Pet Tech Pet First Aid and CPR Seminar. This is a comprehensive, hands-on program. Materials covered include Bleeding and Shock, Restraining and Muzzling, Primary Pet Assessment, Rescue Breathing, CPR, Fracture and Limb Injuries, Insect Bites and Stings, Snake Bite, Seizures, First Aid Kits, Emergency Preparedness Kits, Heat and Cold Injuries, Pet Vitals, Poisoning and Poisonous Substances, Choking and Snout to Tail Assessments. Everyone will have their own stuffed dog to practice on as well as receive a handbook.

The cost is $99 per person and you must register for the class. It is strictly limited to 50 people.

To register for this class: http://www.hhbacker.com/shows/s11/pdf/S11PetFirstAidandCPRSignupForm.pdf

To view a short demo video of this class:

 

 


The Effect of Music on Pets in the Grooming Salon

Dogs and cats are very sensitive creatures. By that, I don’t mean that they are touchy-feely, “let’s talk about our feelings” kind of sensitive. I mean that they are very much in tune to their surroundings, which in turn affects their pysche. The environment you create for them can mean the difference between a well behaved pet and one constantly on the defensive.

 

Sound therapy, Vibrational therapy, Music therapy, and Entrainment are all different words for the same concept:  that the right music can truly soothe the savage beast.

 

Music therapy has ancient origins. Australian Aborigines and Native American Indians used sound to heal from within in their sacred ceremonies. The priest’s of ancient Egypt used vowel sounds to balance chakras. Chakras are energy centers located throughout all living creatures. Everyone has seven major ones located along the axis of their bodies. The Tibetans still use bells, chimes, bowls, and chanting, during their spiritual meditations and practices.

 

Music therapy has modern applications as well. It’s used in hospitals for pain management, labor and delivery, neonatal care, pediatrics, oncology, physical rehabilitation, and pyschotherapy. It is also used with Alzheimer patients and to break up kidney stones. Music therapy is used in zoos to calm agitated animals and in dairy farms to increase milk output.

 

What exactly is music therapy? Music therapy is based on the premise that everything in life has a corresponding musical note or vibrational level. Some of this is instinctive knowledge. For instance, you already know that you can identify someone over the phone by the sound of their voice. Our understanding goes deeper than that, however.  Nanotechnologists at UCLA discovered that the sound of yeast cells differ from that of mammalian cells. A black hole in the heart of the Perseus galaxy cluster was recorded at 57 octaves below middle C in the note of B flat. A healthy heart vibrates at F. The earth itself “hums” at 7.8 Hz, which by the way is the vibration of the alpha waves of our brains. 

 

How does this all relate to pets? While we hear in the 200 to 20,000 Hz range, dogs and cats can hear up to 200,000 Hz. Hence, they are far more sensitive to music than we are. Playing music that puts us in a good mood may only agitate the pet in your care, and nobody wins when they are agitated. You are more likely to get bit or scratched. They are more likely to succumb to stress related injuries.

 

The music I play all day long in my mobile grooming van is a CD by Stephen Halpern titled Chakra Suite. Half the tracks play music in the note individually associated with each one of the seven major Chakras. The other half plays music in sequential notes relating to the chakra system as a whole. As stress can impede the flow of energy, the note corresponding to each Chakra energy point opens the clogged channel. If the energy can flow, the pet is better able to utilize its coping mechanisms resulting in a calmer animal.

 

I love music that keeps me bopping in the truck, but I didn’t make the connection between stressed animals and fast, energetic music until I started playing “Chakra Suite.” Now not only are clients calmer, MY coping mechanisms have improved. Life’s little annoyances don’t seem to bother me as much.  You can find this CD at www.innerpeacemusic.com.

 

 


Pet Tech PetSaver and 3 day Instructor Training in Danbury, CT

Date: Saturday, April 30, 2011 and Saturday, April 30th through Monday, May 2nd.

Time: 9am to 5pm

Where: Danbury Animal Welfare Society

Cost: $150pp for the Saturday, April 30th PetSaver and $1495 for the 3 day Instructor Training

To register: http://www.pawsitivelypretty.com/calendar.htm

This is a comprehensive, hands-on program. Materials covered include Healthy Living, Bleeding and Shock, Restraining and Muzzling,Priorities and Concerns of Emergency Situations, Primary Pet Assessment, Rescue Breathing, CPR, Fracture and Limb Injuries, Insect Bites and Stings, Snake Bite, Seizures, First Aid Kits, Emergency Preparedness Kits, Heat and Cold Injuries, Pet Vitals, Poisoning and Poisonous Substances, Choking, Snout to Tail Assessments, and Dental Care. Everyone will have their own stuffed dog to practice on as well as receive two handbooks.

View a short video of this class

 

The 3 day Instructor begins with the eight hour PetSaver Program followed by an extra hour after class. Day Two is marketing, teaching techniques and a round robin. Day Three is class presentations. It includes the Instructor manual, access to all powerpoint presentations and 10 free handbooks with your first order. There is a yearly fee of $120 payable to Pet Tech at the Instructor training. This fee is for telephone support and listing on Pet Tech's website. To register for this class go to http://www.pawsitivelypretty.com/calendar.htm

  

Date: Sunday, March 27, 2011

Time: 8am to 4pm

Where: Farmingbury Hills Country Club in Wolcott, CT

Cost: $170pp and includes a sit down breakfast and lunch

To register: http://www.pawsitivelypretty.com/calendar.htm

This is a comprehensive, hands-on program. Materials covered include Healthy Living, Bleeding and Shock, Restraining and Muzzling,Priorities and Concerns of Emergency Situations, Primary Pet Assessment, Rescue Breathing, CPR, Fracture and Limb Injuries, Insect Bites and Stings, Snake Bite, Seizures, First Aid Kits, Emergency Preparedness Kits, Heat and Cold Injuries, Pet Vitals, Poisoning and Poisonous Substances, Choking, Snout to Tail Assessments, and Dental Care. Everyone will have their own stuffed dog to practice on as well as receive two handbooks.

View a short video of this class

  

 


Pet Tech PetSaver in Wolcott, CT

Date: Sunday, March 27, 2011

Time: 8am to 4pm

Where: Farmingbury Hills Country Club in Wolcott, CT

Cost: $170pp and includes a sit down breakfast and lunch

To register: http://www.pawsitivelypretty.com/calendar.htm

This is a comprehensive, hands-on program. Materials covered include Healthy Living, Bleeding and Shock, Restraining and Muzzling,Priorities and Concerns of Emergency Situations, Primary Pet Assessment, Rescue Breathing, CPR, Fracture and Limb Injuries, Insect Bites and Stings, Snake Bite, Seizures, First Aid Kits, Emergency Preparedness Kits, Heat and Cold Injuries, Pet Vitals, Poisoning and Poisonous Substances, Choking, Snout to Tail Assessments, and Dental Care. Everyone will have their own stuffed dog to practice on as well as receive two handbooks.

View a short video of this class