Previous month:
September 2020
Next month:
November 2020

October 2020

Why I Love My Planner And So Should You!

I Just Love My Planner

I always have so many irons in the fire and because of that I COULD easily become overwhelmed and nothing gets done. 

It’s my planner that keeps me on track. I schedule what needs to be done at specific times. When I was grooming that included:

  • Grooming appointments along with a lunch break penned (as opposed to penciling) in.
  • Admin tasks, such as return phone calls/texts/emails, paperwork is scheduled on the same time every day.

My planner also includes a weekly to do list. I identify which tasks need to be done on any given day and SCHEDULE them into the planner.

Any long-term projects are broken down into individual tasks.  Those tasks are then scheduled into the planner.

The end of my day is also scheduled into the planner. My day has an end. I want time to read, crochet, and play games.

Vacation and days off are actually the first thing that gets scheduled whenever I get the new year’s planner.  Family time and mental health are important to me.

The night before I take the time to look at the next day’s schedule. AND will set alarms on my phone to make sure things get done when they are supposed to get done. I know I can get sidetracked or totally engrossed at times.

There are literally thousands of different planners out there. What works well for someone, will do nothing for someone else. I have a stack of them on a shelf somewhere. You may go through a couple of lemons before finding one that works for you.

My planner allows me to manage my time and has increased my productivity while having a life outside of work.

Mary is a business, wellness, and safety strategist who specializes in the pet industry. She has contributed to the professional pet industry as a consultant, speaker, writer, and progressive leader. If you are looking for your business to thrive instead of surviving, set up a free Am I A Good Fit For Your Business consultation, visit www.MaryOquendo.com.

Or drop me a message or email her at Mary@PawsitivelyPretty.com


Calming The Grooming Environment

Calming The Grooming Environment

Many years ago I received a call from a pet owner wondering if I groom “evil Chihuahuas.” Her longhaired dog, Pepe was banned from yet another grooming shop. It was suggested to her that Pepe would need sedation at a veterinarian’s office in order to be groomed. 

Even though I was not taking on new clients at the moment, as a Chihuahua mom, I know firsthand that they can react to stressful situations with aggression. We referred to my Chihuahua, Baby, as Grumpy Boy on many an occasion. It was possible that Pepe was overwhelmed in a grooming shop and in a less stimulating atmosphere; such as my mobile grooming van he might behave. It was with that thought I agreed to groom him. I have been grooming him ever since.

Why did Pepe go from evil to pleasant in three grooming appointments?

The truth is it is not what I have; it is what I lacked.

I did not have:

  1. A stream of people coming in and out throughout the day.
  2. Ringing phones.
  3. Other dogs and/or cats.
  4. Several dryers on at the same time.
  5. Pets on grooming tables across from each other.
  6. Groomers walking past each other with pets.
  7. Vacuum cleaners running with pets present.
  8. Many different scents from shampoos to fragrances to cleaning supplies filling the air.

All of these distractions have the potential to over-stimulate even the calmest of pets. As shop owners, what changes can be made to minimize the effects of normal day-to-day operations?

De-cluttering

 

Did you know that when you are surrounded by disorganization, your body secretes Cortisol? Cortisol is a stress hormone. Animals can smell those hormones and may react to them as well. In addition, according to feng shui, clutter blocks energy from free flow and results in tired energy. Cleaning and re-organizing your shop can result in calmer and efficient groomers.

Color

There are many studies done by universities regarding the effect color has on our productivity and emotions. Advertisers have fully embraced this concept since color print ads became available. It is not a coincidence that the major fast food chains use red, yellow, and orange in their packaging and logos. In fact, you are more likely to consume three times the calories there than in a restaurant using blue. Fast food restaurants rely on volume. Next time you are shopping, look at the packaging you are first attracted to. Woman are more likely to buy pastel or muted color packaging while men like dark and bold colors.

The colors best suited for a grooming shop are both light blues and greens. Blues are calming and relaxing. Green is soothing on the eyes and may reduce stress. In fact, studies show that people who work in green offices are happier and more productive. If it is not feasible to repaint, then add in blues and greens via new grooming smocks, curtains, policy signs, or paint the workstations.

Sound

 

Dr. Deborah Wells, a psychologist and animal behaviorist, completed a research project to determine the effects of classical, heavy metal, pop, talk, and no sound had on animals. The study concluded that pop, talk, and no sound had no effect one way or the other. However, heavy metal caused increase in agitation and barking amongst the dogs in the study. Classical music resulted in calmer dogs that spent more time resting rather than standing and barking. The other benefit of classical music is that it also improved the mood and reduced stress in people.

Good musical choices include classical and pop. My personal choice is a CD titled Chakra Suite by Steven Halpern.

 

Lighting

 

There are four choices in lighting. The first is natural or full spectrum. This light spans the full visual spectrum, similar to that of the sun. The second is incandescent lights. It is close to full spectrum, but not quite. The third is white LED. As a note, studies have indicated concerns using blue or red LEDS on a continually basis. The fourth is fluorescent lighting, which has a very limited visual spectrum.  Fluorescent lighting also flickers.
“Although humans cannot see fluorescent lights flicker, the sensory system in some individuals can somehow detect the flicker. Ever since fluorescent lighting was introduced in workplaces, there have been complaints about headaches, eye strain and general eye discomfort. These complaints have been associated with the light flicker from fluorescent lights. When compared to regular fluorescent lights with magnetic ballasts, the use of high frequency electronic ballasts (20,000 Hz or higher) in fluorescent lights resulted in more than a 50% drop in complaints of eye strain and headaches. There tended to be fewer complaints of headaches among workers on higher floors compared to those closer to ground level; that is, workers exposed to more natural light experienced fewer health effects. [Fluorescent lighting, headaches and eye-strain. A. J. Wilkins, I. Nimmo-Smith, I., A. Slater & L. Bedocs. Lighting Research and Technology, 1989. Vol. 21, 11-18]”

In addition, our body chemistry and that of the pet is based on a day/night cycle. If not enough time is spent in full sunlight, it impacts the circadian rhythm, which in turn affects the hormones. The circadian rhythm is a biological process that sets the body’s internal clock to 24 hours.

The effects of this disruption may include migraines, eyestrain, problems sleeping, depression, unhealthy immune and endocrine systems, stress, anxiety, and obesity. By replacing the fluorescent bulbs with either incandescent or full spectrum may help mitigate these problems.

Stick with the first 3 options.

Scent

The sense of smell is linked to the limbic system. The limbic system is the oldest part of our development. It is connected to the parts of the brain that control blood pressure and stress levels. In addition, the olfactory center (the nose) interacts with the hippocampus (seat of the memory) in the brain. The first sniff of something will trigger a nerve response. Different fragrances will illicit different responses.

Calming scents include: rose, jasmine, neroli, geranium, lavender, chamomile, coconut, and sandlewood.

Uplifting scents include: basil, citrus, catnip, cedar wood, cinnamon, eucalyptus, grapefruit, and lemon.

A note for cats:

Cats cannot metabolize many essential oils because they lack many of the necessary enzymes. Instead of releasing the oils through the kidneys and livers, they are stored there instead. Over time, it can cause physical harm to the cat. As a general rule, I do not use essential oils around cats. I will, however,  use hydrosols. Hydrosols are the steam distillates of essential oils and are a safer alternative.

Positive Energy

 

Did you know that happiness is contagious? That’s because our body secretes endorphins when we are happy. On the flip side, anger is a heavy energy that does not seem to dissipate. Both moods can infect those around you. Keeping the work area positive may mean you need to release the negative.

As both a Reiki and Crystal Therapy practitioner, I use both to keep the energy light, positive, and free flowing in my mobile grooming van. I have rose quartz tucked away in many corners of van including the tub.

Turns out that Pepe was never an evil Chihuahua. Maybe a little misunderstood and definitely overwhelmed. He is an easy groom and mom is very appreciative that her little baby is well taken care of. And is that not what we strive for? Happy client, happy pets.

Mary is a business, wellness, and safety strategist who specializes in the pet industry. She has contributed to the professional pet industry as a consultant, speaker, writer, and progressive leader. If you are looking for your business to thrive instead of surviving, set up a free Am I A Good Fit For Your Business consultation, visit www.MaryOquendo.com.

Or drop me a message or email her at Mary@PawsitivelyPretty.com


Power Of A Press Release

Take Advantage Of A Press Release

 Take advantage of the power of a press release.

A well-written press release is free advertising. Emphasis on well-written. If all a newspaper editor has to do is copy and paste, its more likely to see print. In addition, business editors are always on the look out for feel good articles on local businesses. You can’t put a dollar amount on the exposure your business will receive from such an article.

Elements of a good press release:

  • Keep it businesslike.
  • Leave out the adjectives and adverbs.
  • Just the facts.

An example of a new hire press release:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE NEW HIRE (name of hire)

Created: (Date)

(Name of business) hires (name) as (job title)

(Name of business) is pleased to announce the addition of (name) to the (name of business) team. (name) brings (list skills and qualifications).

(Quote by new hire on why she wants to work there)

(Any change to services or schedules, or types of animals seen should be mentioned in this paragraph.)

(last paragraph is on the business and what it brings to the community)

This can be adapted if you are just starting out, getting a new van, adding a specialty service, or adding retail. Anything that is different is cause to write and submit press releases. I have had three articles written on my businesses over the years due to press releases.  

Mary is a business, wellness, and safety strategist who specializes in the pet industry. She has contributed to the professional pet industry as a consultant, speaker, writer, and progressive leader. If you are looking for your business to thrive instead of surviving, set up a free Am I A Good Fit For Your Business consultation, visit www.MaryOquendo.com.

Or drop me a message or email her at Mary@PawsitivelyPretty.com


Failing To Succeed

Failing To Succeed

See that picture. What a bunch of losers we are!

 

It was taken a couple of years ago at the Barkleigh Honors dinner. We all lost. We failed to succeed.

What exactly does that mean?

Did you know that Henry Ford had 5 failed businesses? R.H.Macy had 7. Walt Disney was fired from a newspaper job due to lack of creativity. (insert eye roll here)

“I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” – Thomas A. Edison

It isn’t failing that’s devastating; it’s fear of failure and learning what didn’t work. Fear of failure is what keeps many people from even trying. And not understanding the flaw is what prevents those from trying again. Can you imagine a world without Mickey Mouse? What if Walt Disney quit after his second bankruptcy?

“Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.” – Robert F. Kennedy

Let’s talk about one of my failures. Just one. I could talk about more, but we would be here all day.

My goal was to teach pet first aid to the pet grooming industry at national educational conferences and trade shows. My friend, Beth, and I took the training and began teaching local classes. Some of these classes had ONE person in them. To fully appreciate this, we are both mobile groomers who wouldn’t get out of bed for less than $400 for the day and we were splitting $150 for the day before expenses.

First failure. We approached a trade show director about teaching the class at an upcoming show. We were asked if we could teach a class of 50. We lied and said yes. She was nice about it, but I could tell she was just being polite.

Second failure. We approached another trade show director at a different show and this time we were prepared with a course description and bio’s. She smiled and thanked us.

Third failure. We approached the second trade show director at the next conference and added a crappy video of our class. This time she looked at me and said, “You’re the gals that teach pet first aid.” Took the video and went on her way.

In all this time, neither of us gave up. We evolved our pitch and worked on our skills, knowing we will teach this. We worked and prepared for that day.

Our first class didn’t come from any of the trade show directors we approached, but rather from different show.

We have since taught pet first aid to thousands of pet professionals.

Look at that picture again. None of us let not winning something stand in the way of moving forward and continuing to contribute to the industry we love. In fact, we ran over to Ren (show photographer) before the winners even had an opportunity take their photo and made him take it. He thought we were nuts.

What are you failing to succeed at today?

Mary is a business, wellness, and safety strategist who specializes in the pet industry. She has contributed to the professional pet industry as a consultant, speaker, writer, and progressive leader. If you are looking for your business to thrive instead of surviving, set up a free Am I A Good Fit For Your Business consultation, visit www.MaryOquendo.com.

Or drop me a message or email her at Mary@PawsitivelyPretty.com